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[Prev]  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 18, 19, 20 ... 46, 47  [Next]
Page 19 of 47   [ 691 posts ]
AuthorMessage
dazpicable avatar
Posted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 09:38
Author: Site FriendET junkieET loverSunTurtle
ange1 wrote:
Hello Thalestris thank you for the awesome news around the world :) ooh can't wait to see the spin off of the walking dead.... seen the first 3 minutes trailer and looked pretty interesting..... Melissa McCarthy is a brilliant funny beautiful lady. I love to see her as she is not your typical stick thin actress trying to keep up with the film industry of today being skinny . I know it must be hard for actors who have to keep up with it all but why. Looks are not everything in life and i think society forgets that. Beauty is skin deep and what counts above all is what is on the inside.

Abhi love your quotes and especially the quote by Gilles Douaire....
Tried to post on the main recent section says bad gateway 502 the swine lol.

Hemlock grove coming back, well my youngest will be pleased hard to believe it's only been just over a year, feels longer.


Bill Skarsgård, now that's a talented family bit like the Redmans have a mooch about, bet you will be suprised at some of the series and films they have starred in between them.
Abhi121 avatar
Posted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 11:42
Author:
dazpicable wrote:
Tried to post on the main recent section says bad gateway 502 the swine lol.

lol ...

Hello there Everyone :) .... and nice info Thalestris ... thanks :D .....

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Thalestris avatar
Posted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 15:25
Author: Turtle
Hi Daz & Abhi, and hi everybody ! gHdOO4Y.gif I hope that you're all having a great Friday ..? The week end is nearly there .. wGHkwn3.gif And Daz, yes I fully agree with you, there's something really appealing about the Skarsgard family, Stellan ,the father, is probably one of the best actors of our times in my opinion. Thank you both for your visit and Abhi, great quote as usual wGHkwn3.gif

And today, I do hope that you haven't read one of those articles somewhere before, so I'll take my chances and I'll give it a shot .. vTboF2W.gif I'm going to talk about yakuza first, and then, because it's been a while now, yeah virus , our little friend .. And I'll add a few pics, and, a few trailers in the end. So let's go !

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Japanese police bracing for gang war as Yamaguchi-gumi mafia group splits
Reports Japan’s biggest crime syndicate is about split with potential outbreak of violence between breakaway group and those loyal to leader Tsukasa

Police in Japan are bracing for an outbreak of gang violence after reports that the Yamaguchi-gumi — the country’s biggest crime syndicate — is about to split.

Japanese media reports said the organisation had been hit by rows over members’ divided loyalties toward the gang’s boss, Shinobu Tsukasa.

The 73-year-old, who became Japan’s most powerful mafia don in 2005, has reportedly angered affiliated gangs by giving preferential treatment to certain members and spearheading a push into new territory far from the gang’s traditional turf.

Tsukasa, who also goes by the name Kenichi Shinoda, was released from prison in April 2011 after serving a six-year sentence for firearms possession.

The Yamaguchi-gumi — whose members account for just under half of Japan’s gangsters — has been called the Walmart of the country’s underworld for its ability to see off opponents and generate huge earnings.

According to police sources quoted by the Sankei Shimbun newspaper, more than a dozen gangs with connections to the Yamaguchi-gumi decided to form a breakaway group in protest at the emphasis Tsukasa is placing on the Kodo-kai, a Nagoya-based affiliate he founded in 1984.

Under Tsukasa, the Kodo-kai has been expanding its influence in Tokyo and other parts of eastern Japan — a move that has angered members in the Yamaguchi-gumi’s traditional base in western Japan.

Police are preparing for a possible outbreak of violence between the new breakaway group and the 20 organisations that remain loyal to Tsukasa, Japanese media said.

Law enforcement officials fear a repeat of the bloodshed that followed a similar split in the 1980s, when more than 20 gangsters were killed and hundreds arrested over a five-year period.

Police in the western port city of Kobe —the location of Yamaguchi-gumi headquarters— believe the latest round of mutually destructive strife could spark more deadly confrontations.

The police are reportedly very concerned, and are taking measures to pre-empt any problems that might happen this time around,” said Brett Bull, who writes about organised crime for the Tokyo Reporter website.

High-ranking members of the dissenting groups reportedly failed to attend a meeting at the Yamaguchi-gumi’s headquarters this week. The break is expected to be formalised at a gathering of senior crime bosses early next month, media reports said.

Although their capacity for violence pales alongside that of the mafia and Chinese triads, Japan’s yakuza groups make their money from activities ranging from prostitution to extortion and white-collar crime.

Membership of the yakuza is not illegal, but recent police crackdowns and the faltering economy have eaten into gang profits and made membership less attractive than it was during the “bubble” years of the 1980s.

“The latest split is more about Japan’s economy rather than the ongoing police crackdown,” Bull said. “Simply put, there is more money to be made in Tokyo, and the Yamaguchi-gumi’s shift in emphasis towards the Kodo-kai and Tokyo has caused frustration among gang members in western Japan.

Yakuza membership fell to an all-time low in 2013, slipping below 60,000 members for the first time, down from about 63,200 in 2012, according to the national police agency.

Local governments have introduced laws aimed at shaming legitimate businesses into shunning the mob. Firms that knowingly do business with the yakuza risk having their names made public if they refuse to sever their ties with organised crime. Repeat offenders face fines of up to 500,000 yen, and company officials can face jail terms of up to a year.

Faced with depleting returns from traditional sources of income such as gambling and drug smuggling, some gangs have become active in the stock market, earning their money through “respectable” front companies.

The shift to white collar crime prompted authorities in the US to freeze the Yamaguchi-gumi’s assets after evidence emerged of a lucrative international operation that included weapons trafficking, prostitution, human trafficking and money laundering.

Tsukasa, the Yamaguchi-gumi’s sixth head in its 100-year history, served 13 years in prison for killing a rival with a samurai sword in the 1970s while he was the leader of the notorious Kodo-kai.

The Yamaguchi-gumi was formed in 1915 by a former fisherman, Harukichi Yamaguchi, on the island of Awaji, near Kobe. It currently has just over 23,000 members, according to police, and is active in all but three of Japan’s 47 prefectures.

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Utah man dies of bubonic plague in fourth US death this year
Fourth fatality out of 12 cases adds up to highest death rate in 15 years, but health authorities say risk remains very small overall

A man in his 70s in Utah has died after contracting the plague, bringing to four the number of deaths from the disease reported in the United States this year, health officials have said.

Officials said they believed the victim might have contracted the disease from a flea or contact with a dead animal.

That’s the most common way to get it,” said JoDee Baker, an epidemiologist with the agency. “That’s probably what happened but we’re still doing an investigation into that.

The rare disease that is carried by rodents and spread by fleas. It is naturally occurring in Utah rodents and is often seen in prairie dog populations. Wildlife and health officials confirmed in July that an outbreak of bubonic plague killed 60 to 80 prairie dogs in an eastern Utah colony.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 12 human cases had been reported in six states since 1 April. The other three people who died were ages 16, 52 and 79.

Anywhere between one and 17 cases of the illness have been reported each year in the US since 2000, according to the CDC. Deaths are rare, with no more than two a year having been recorded over the past 15 years.

However Dr Paul Mead said four deaths so far this year was not necessarily a cause for alarm. “Yes it’s twice as many, but when you’re dealing with small numbers, you have that kind of variation.”

Patients in a few of the 11 other cases this year came down with the plague after visiting Yosemite national park in California.

The last human case of plague in Utah was in 2009, but state health department spokeswoman Charla Haley said no deaths from plague had been recorded in the state in at least 35 years.

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Extreme Arctic sea ice melt forces thousands of walruses ashore in Alaska
Survival of walruses threatened as they wash ashore on a remote barrier island just before Obama is due to visit region to draw attention to climate change Aerial photograph of thousands of Pacific walrus coming ashore near Point Lay, on the north-west Arctic coast of Alaska, on Sunday. Photograph: Gary Braasch

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Trimbakeshwar, India
A naga sadhu, or naked Hindu holy man, smokes hashish inside his tent during Kumbh Mela, or pitcher festival. Hindus believe taking a dip in the waters of a holy river during the festival will cleanse them of their sins. The festival is held four times every 12 years.
Photograph: Rajanish Kakade

Eden: When a US soccer team gets stranded on a deserted island after a plane crash they must face difficult choices to survive. Modern day Lord of the Flies. Director: Shyam Madiraju, Writers: Mark Mavrothalasitis (screenplay), Mark Mavrothalasitis, Cast: Jessica Lowndes, James Remar, Sung Kang, 2014, Thriller.





Wolf Totem : In 1967, a young Beijing student, Chen Zhen, is sent to live among the nomadic herdsmen of Inner Mongolia. Caught between the advance of civilization from the south and the nomads' traditional enemies - the marauding wolves - to the north; humans and animals, residents and invaders alike, struggle to find their true place in the world. Director: Jean-Jacques Annaud, Writers: Jiang Rong (novel), Jean-Jacques Annaud (screenplay), Cast: Shaofeng Feng, Shawn Dou, Ankhnyam Ragchaa, 2015, Adventure.





Misery Loves Comedy: Over fifty very famous American and Canadian funny people (filmmakers, writers, actors and comedians) share life and professional journeys and insights, in an effort to shed light on the thesis: Do you have to be miserable to be funny? Director: Kevin Pollak, Writers: Kevin Pollak, Kevin Pollak,
Cast: Amy Schumer, James L. Brooks, Judd Apatow,
2015, Documentary.





Wishing you all a great Friday and a nice week end ! wGHkwn3.gif
ange1 avatar
Posted: Sat Aug 29, 2015 07:48
Author: ModeratorET lover
Hello Thalestris daz Abhi and all :)

Thank you for that very interesting Topic regarding the Bubonic Plague. Many diseases that were once eradicated are now back in this Century even more advanced and deadly dangerous.... Tuberculosis ( TB ) is one of them.. The bacteria can affect any other parts of the body and not just the Lungs and can even cause a deadly strain of TB Meningitis... An interesting factor.... The BCG Vaccine (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) actually only last between 13 and 15 years and not a lifetime which many have peeps once believed lasted a lifetime. Let's hope that new research will bring a Vaccine that will hopefully last longer than 15 years or better still a lifetime :)
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Sat Aug 29, 2015 15:01
Author: Turtle
ange1 wrote:
Hello Thalestris daz Abhi and all :)

Thank you for that very interesting Topic regarding the Bubonic Plague. Many diseases that were once eradicated are now back in this Century even more advanced and deadly dangerous.... Tuberculosis ( TB ) is one of them.. The bacteria can affect any other parts of the body and not just the Lungs and can even cause a deadly strain of TB Meningitis... An interesting factor.... The BCG Vaccine (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) actually only last between 13 and 15 years and not a lifetime which many have peeps once believed lasted a lifetime. Let's hope that new research will bring a Vaccine that will hopefully last longer than 15 years or better still a lifetime :)

Hi ange and Abhi gHdOO4Y.gif And I agree with you ange, researchers will probably make other incredible discoveries in the nearest future, I mean, I never believed that they would be able to cure Ebola one day and apparently, it's the case, so there's hope.

Ok and today, my ET friends, it's going to be a short post, first because I didn't read anything that extraordinary, and second ,because I need to relax too and take some fresh air you know, it's a sunny day, it's been a rainy week.. I think that you'll understand wGHkwn3.gif anyways, it's all about rock today ! First the story behind the pic, then a trailer, and I'll add 2 you tube videos. Here we go !

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Robert Stredder, 29, kissing at the Isle of Wight festival, 1970 (Photograph: William Lovelace)
I can’t remember her name. I was only with her for the duration of the festival. You lose friends all the time in a crowd of half a million, and there were no mobile phones so it was hopeless’

I was living in Brighton, doing theatre acting when I met the band Hawkwind. They had about 30 drummers, and invited me to join them backstage at the Isle of Wight festival in 1970 as a sort of extra. I played a small African drum, a djembe, made of goatskin. We weren’t part of the official festival. There were two stages: the main festival stage, and the one behind it, which faced a hill where about half a million people gathered, people who couldn’t afford to get in. Hawkwind played when there were gaps in the show.

In this photograph, we’re on that hill. The woman was a girlfriend of mine, but I can’t remember her name. I was only with her for the duration of the festival. You lose friends all the time in a crowd of half a million, and there were no mobile phones, so it was hopeless. We had an understanding that if we lost each other, we would meet at the King & Queen pub in Brighton, and I think we did. She wasn’t the great love of my life, but she was good fun.

At the time, I remember papers such as the Daily Mail and the Sun were disapproving of festivalgoers, but it was a really mixed audience – you couldn’t generalise like that. Most people didn’t have tents, so we just slept in the open, under a rug.

It was a wonderful festival musically, and quite anarchic, but so unhygienic. Rubbish was everywhere. The toilets were awful – overflowing with shit, so most people would go up the hill, dig a hole, and go in the heather. The people of the Isle of Wight didn’t want another festival after that; this was the last one they did until 2000.

The day Jimi Hendrix played, people pushed the fence over and about 10,000 of us ran down the hill and followed them in. I got to 40 yards from the stage. He played the first note and I completely crashed out. I hadn’t slept in three days. My friend tried to wake me up, but I missed the whole thing.

A few weeks after the festival, I was in Gothenburg: we were in a nightclub and the DJ announced that Hendrix had died. There was nearly a riot, because the DJ said something like: “Hendrix has died, serves him right.” It went down like a lead balloon. I was very upset, and knowing I’d come so close but never really heard him play, I cried.

I first saw this photograph a week or so after Isle of Wight. My friends brought me the Observer magazine, stuck it in front of me, and said: “You’re famous!” It felt weird because I didn’t know the photographer had been there, but I don’t blame him for taking the shot.

I’m an actor now, living in Swindon. When I look back at this picture, I feel it’s quite naive and innocent. Despite the anarchy, we went there for the music. We were just having a good time.

Rock the Kasbah: A down-on-his-luck music manager discovers a teenage girl with an extraordinary voice while on a music tour in Afghanistan and takes her to Kabul to compete on the popular television show, Afghan Star. Director: Barry Levinson, Writer: Mitch Glazer (screenplay), Cast: Zooey Deschanel, Bruce Willis, Kate Hudson, 2015, Comedy.













Wishing you all a great Saturday and a fun week end ! And tonight it's the full moon by the way !!

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Thalestris avatar
Posted: Mon Aug 31, 2015 16:30
Author: Turtle
Hi everybody gHdOO4Y.gif so I hope that you all had a great week end. For my part, um, I'm a bit of a zombie today, a wreck really, I didn't sleep much last night, because of that storm again.. Anyways, I'll make this post even if I didn't find new interesting trailers, hopefully tomorrow.. So I'll talk about insomnia then, Mr Wes Craven and I'll add a few pics.

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Can’t sleep? Try getting less
‘By reducing your “sleep window”, you’re raising the stakes, giving your powers of sleep a real challenge, which brings out the best in them’

Recently, I decided to try to deal with a bout of insomnia by deliberately getting even less sleep. If this strikes you as absurd, I can only reply that it’s no more absurd than what most insomniacs do instead: lie awake in bed for hours every night, getting more wakeful the harder they try to drop off, while ruminating on horrifying existential truths. (Such as: did you know there isn’t an infinite supply of This American Life podcasts? Only insomniacs discover this.) Besides, “sleep restriction therapy” (SRT), as it’s known, is growing in popularity; some evidence suggests it’s as effective as pills.

When you’re sleeping poorly, your instinct is to spend more time in bed, to catch up. To which SRT arches an eyebrow and enquires: “Oh yes? And how’s that working out for you?”

Seek expert advice before deliberately depriving yourself of sleep, but the basics of SRT are simple. First, pick a fixed getting-up time – let’s say 7am – and enforce it like a fascist. Second, over a week or two, work out how much sleep you really get per night, on average. Say five hours. Now the hard part: your job is to stay out of your bedroom, and awake, until five hours before your rising time – 2am. If five hours is all the sleep you get, five hours is all you’ll have. (Don’t go below 4.5h. As things improve, you’ll gradually extend time in bed: see here.)

If my experience is anything to go by, you’ll be bleary and irritated as you struggle to stay up – and, at first, exhausted during the day. But you’ll also start sleeping remarkably deeply.

Partly, what’s happening is a breaking of the subconscious link between being in bed and miserably awake. But SRT also embodies the principle of “hormesis” – the idea, in the words of blogger Todd Becker, that “to combat a stress you should apply judicious amounts of that very stress, to train the mind or body to adapt”. Something that in huge doses might kill you, as sleep deprivation can, is actively good for you in modest doses – better than no dose at all.

To build muscle, you need weights that are hard to lift. To build your child’s immunity, expose them to certain germs, rather than obsessively keeping them clean: “What does not kill me makes me stronger,” said Nietzsche, who’d surely have been brilliant as the star of a Supernanny-style reality-parenting show.

So it figures that by reducing your “sleep window”, you’re raising the stakes, giving your powers of sleep a real challenge, which brings out the best in them. (By contrast, responding to insomnia by increasing time in bed lowers the stakes: it becomes less important that you’re asleep for any given hour you’re trying.)

And not just sleep: if you want to do your best at some work project, try giving yourself only a few hours – as any journalist faced with a deadline knows. Come to think of it, the solution to insomnia has been staring me in the face all this time, in the glowering expressions of impatient editors. When things absolutely have to get done, they have a curious way of getting done.

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Wes Craven: the mainstream horror maestro inspired by Ingmar Bergman
It was the Swedish auteur who prompted the late director to pursue a career in movie-making. His influence can be traced right through Craven’s brilliant, chilling career

Wes Craven’s career is a startling link between the European arthouse and Hollywood exploitation horror. This was no movie brat, growing up obsessively watching movies on VHS, getting steeped in trash-celluloid lore, knowing scenes by heart and shooting his own homemade version on Super 8 at the age of nine in the way we might expect of a hugely successful genre director.

In any case, his upbringing was before the era of video (he was born in 1939) and his strictly religious parents hardly let him go to the cinema at all. In fact, after an initial plan to go into teaching, Craven’s move to New York from his hometown of Cleveland as a young man introduced him to arthouse theatres where he was electrified by the work of directors like Ingmar Bergman: it was this that inspired him to go into film-making and he had the idea of remaking Bergman’s 1960 film Virgin Spring as The Last House on the Left in 1972 — three years before Woody Allen’s Love and Death pastiched Bergman, among other high European masters, in an obviously cod-reverential way.

Craven took from Virgin Spring the idea of people enacting revenge for the rape and murder of their daughter, but in a more obviously secularised, ironised and sensational style. Wes Craven could be said to have invented, or at least popularised the modern rape-revenge genre and ironically did so in the same era when the name “Bergman” became a widely understood talk-show punchline for jokes about Hollywood trash vs highbrow Europeans.

Despite helping Meryl Streep to an Oscar nomination with his atypical 1999 movie Music of the Heart, a syrupy film about an inspirational teacher, Craven of course became a horror maestro, with a flair for developing sequel-spawning properties. He began his career with the potent, influential The Hills Have Eyes about the family being targeted by a sinister group in the desert.

But it was his great franchises Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream (co-written with Kevin Williamson) which gave him his legendary status. Nightmare on Elm Street was an endlessly quotable, malleable phrase for headline-writers all over the English-speaking world, especially in the UK where “Elm” was always being replaced with “Downing”. Each franchise crucially had its horribly familiar, nightmarishly recognisable villain-hero: Freddy Krueger and Ghostface.

Nightmare on Elm Street had the brilliant idea of the demon haunting one’s dreams – that grotesque figure in a hat, burned face and clawed glove. The young Johnny Depp was in the first Nightmare: did Freddy Krueger inspire a kind of romanticised, Jekyllised version in Edward Scissorhands? Nightmare collapsed the distinction between dreams and reality, and perhaps even hinted at an awareness of the horror genre’s own status as the culturally licensed bad dream.

But it was actually Scream which was the really playfully self-referential movie series, a franchise which became a key text for the 1990s fashion for postmodernism and all things meta. It spoofed and pastiched the scary genre itself, drawing attention to its own tropes and tricks, knowingly tipping the wink to fans. The title was originally going to be Scary Movie, a tag gratefully picked up by the Wayans brothers in their own out-and-out send-up movie series.

Again, Craven was a pioneer: he popularised this element of sophistication, laying the groundwork for a picture like, say, The Cabin in the Woods, scripted by Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard. But Scream isn’t just a comedy. There is something genuinely disturbing about the elongated dropped jaw of Ghostface, distended in its endless silent scream. When I saw this film first, I thought of the ghost of Jacob Marley in A Christmas Carol: taking off the bandage around his head, his lower jaw drops down to his chest.

Not everyone admired Craven’s style. David Thomson wrote: “… the postmodern self-reflection of Wes Craven’s New Nightmare and the Scream pictures … amounts to a frenzied redoubling of nastiness because no one really believes in it.” Well, it is an accusation which could be perennially levelled at all horror movies or even fairground rides: dark, scary thrills do not have much in the way of moral edification. But horror films can be lethally brilliant, immersive experiences. Those are what Wes Craven provided.









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Timal, Nepal
Witch doctors perform religious rituals during the Janai Purnima festival
. Photograph: Narendra Shrestha

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Paris, France
Hindu devotees smash coconuts to clean the soil as they take part in a procession to honour the Hindu god Ganesha.
Photograph: Etienne Laurent

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Kos, Greece
A man cooks food over a fire at an abandoned hotel that has been a refuge for many migrant families.
Photograph: Dan Kitwood

Wishing you all a great Monday, morning, afternoon, evening and good luck for tomorrow ! wGHkwn3.gif


Thalestris avatar
Posted: Tue Sep 01, 2015 17:04
Author: Turtle
Hi everybody gHdOO4Y.gif I hope that you had all a great Monday ? So, today, I won't talk about what's all over the news .. And to be honest, I didn't spot a good story so, I'll just put those 2 articles..But, I do have a few interesting pics and 2 new trailers; And, I'll post a few more, but you may have seen those ones before I think.. So here we go !

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Daniel Craig: James Bond less 'sexist' than before
The actor has claimed to be nothing like 007 and believes there is a ‘great sadness’ behind the agent’s womanising behaviour

Daniel Craig has called out his most famous on-screen character for his solitary lifestyle and dated views of the opposite sex.

The actor, who will be starring as James Bond for the fourth time in this year’s Spectre, has spoken about his thoughts on the secret agent in an interview with Esquire.

He’s very fucking lonely,” he said. “There’s a great sadness. He’s fucking these beautiful women but then they leave and it’s … sad. And as a man gets older it’s not a good look. It might be a nice fantasy – that’s debatable – but the reality, after a couple of months …”

Craig also addressed Bond’s views of the opposite sex and while he does believe there’s been an improvement, he still thinks the character has a lot to learn.

Hopefully, my Bond is not as sexist and misogynistic as [earlier incarnations],” he said. “The world has changed. I am certainly not that person. But he is, and so what does that mean? It means you cast great actresses and make the parts as good as you can for the women in the movies.

In the upcoming spy adventure, Craig’s female co-stars are Léa Seydoux and Monica Bellucci, who, in an unlikely twist, will actually be three years older than Craig. Bond has traditionally romanced younger women - in Skyfall, Bérénice Marlohe was 11 years his junior.

Spectre will be Craig’s penultimate outing as Bond and the actor also spoke about what he will miss most about the role.

You know, it sounds awful but I’ve been left a wealthy man by doing this,” he said. “I can afford to live very comfortably. Things are taken care of. Family and kids are taken care of and that’s a massive relief in anybody’s life. I’m incredibly fortunate.”

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Nicholas Hoult to play JD Salinger in new biopic
Rebel in the Rye is set to explore the birth of the reclusive writer’s best-known work

Nicholas Hoult is to play JD Salinger in a new biopic which will tell the story of the creation of the reclusive author’s classic novel of teenage disaffection, Catcher in the Rye, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Rebel in the Rye will be based on Kenneth Slawenski’s biography JD Salinger: A Life, which explores the writer’s life prior to the publication in 1951 of his most famous work. Danny Strong, co-creator of the hit television show Empire, has adapted the screenplay from Slawenski’s book, and will also direct.

The Catcher in the Rye is a classic coming of age story which continues to make a significant impression six generations later,” said Alex Walton of sales company Bloom, which will tout the film to potential buyers at the upcoming Toronto film festival. “The world has long been fascinated with JD Salinger, who the talented Nicholas Hoult will bring to life, in this enigmatic role.”

Slawenski’s biography largely focuses on Salinger’s life up to the publication of Catcher in the Rye in 1951 at the age of 32, after which the writer gradually withdrew from public life. Blurb about the book on the website of publisher Penguin Random House reads:

Kenneth Slawenski explores Salinger’s privileged youth, long obscured by misrepresentation and rumour, revealing the brilliant, sarcastic, vulnerable son of a disapproving father and doting mother. Here too are accounts of Salinger’s first broken heart – after Eugene O’Neill’s daughter, Oona, left him – and the devastating World War II service that haunted him forever. JD Salinger features all the dazzle of this author’s early writing successes, his dramatic encounters with luminaries from Ernest Hemingway to Elia Kazan, his office intrigues with famous New Yorker editors and writers, and the stunning triumph of The Catcher in the Rye, which would both make him world-famous and hasten his retreat into the hills of New Hampshire.

Salinger, who died in 2010 at the age of 91, was famously protective of film rights to his greatest work, turning down offers from Billy Wilder, Harvey Weinstein, and Steven Spielberg during his lifetime. However, he was clear that Catcher in the Rye represented an autobiographical statement, telling a high school newspaper in 1953: “My boyhood was very much the same as that of the boy in the book ... [It] was a great relief telling people about it.”

Wokingham-born Hoult, 25, has been steadily building a career in the US, largely with strong supporting turns, since transferring to Hollywood following early success in the British television series Skins and as a child actor in 2002’s About a Boy. His best known film roles include a turn as a zombie redeveloping human instincts in the horror-romance Warm Bodies, as furry blue mutant Beast in the X-Men films and as a brainwashed, shaven-headed desert warrior in this year’s critically-acclaimed sci-fi reboot Mad Max: Fury Road.

Rebel in the Rye is the second Salinger biopic to be announced in recent years. In 2013 the BBC reported that Hollywood super-producer Harvey Weinstein’s The Weinstein Company was set to work with film-maker and author Shane Salerno, who wrote the New York Times bestselling biography Salinger and its accompanying documentary, on a new movie. However that project appears to have since become caught up in development hell.

3sY06A4l.jpg

Tokyo, Japan
Schoolchildren wear fireproof hoods as they take part in an earthquake drill at a school. Nationwide drills were held on Tuesday on the anniversary of the 1923 Tokyo earthquake, which killed more than 100,000 people

Photograph: Yoshikazu Tsuno/

nmEBqrIl.jpg

The shark surfer by Thomas P Peschak
Finalist, Photojournalism award: single image
Many sharks are found at Aliwal Shoal near Durban, South Africa, making it the perfect place to test a prototype surfboard with an electromagnetic shark deterrent

Photograph: Thomas P Peschak

YFfIVkxl.jpg

Shanghai, China
People visit the Rain Room, an installation by Random International. It creates a field of falling water that stops in the area where people walk, allowing them to stay dry

Photograph: Aly Song

cbgdnIdl.jpg

Nevada, US
A man rides past an art installation during the Burning Man festival in the Black Rock desert. About 70,000 people from all over the world gather each year for a week of art and music and a unique community experience.
Photograph: Jim Urquhart





















Wishing you all a great Tuesday, morning, afternoon, evening and good luck for tomorrow ! wGHkwn3.gif
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Wed Sep 02, 2015 16:46
Author: Turtle
Hi everybody ! gHdOO4Y.gif so what's up in the world ... Um, well, you're probably hearing the same horrible stuff than I am so.. I won't talk about those. And after all, I did say that I wouldn't talk twice about those events. Anyways, it's becoming a little bit more difficult everyday to surprise you I must admit vTboF2W.gif I did spot that article about Francis Bacon's life, but damn, I always found his work utterly depressing..so I dropped it. So I'll talk to you about red and Toby Stephens instead. And I've added a few pics and trailers in the end.

UXwwIA5l.jpg

Why red is the oldest colour
From the earliest daubs of our ancestors 17,000 years ago to the red carpet, there are plenty of reasons why one colour rules supreme

If any colour can stake a claim to be the oldest, it is red. We’ve been seeing red (an expression which turns out to be more than just metaphorical) since our neolithic days. It is the most primary of primary colours – the very blood in our veins is red. Except, of course, when it’s blue.

On the earliest daubs of our remote human ancestors, red stole the show. In the caves of Lascaux in France, or Pinnacle Point in South Africa, can be found paintings in an earthy, dusty red. This pigment – along with other colours used – was made from ochre, a family of earth pigments whose name is now, confusingly, most associated with the yellow-brown pigment found in art shops and painting sets. These paintings date back perhaps as far as 15,000BC. Red is ancient indeed.

Many Stone Age graves, too, have been found to contain red ochre. Some experts theorise this was simply to mark the grave, so no one mistakenly dug it up. Others believe it was used to colour the hair, skin or clothes of the buried – either way, it clearly had important ritual significance.

Unsurprisingly, red appears as a symbolic colour in many a warrior setting. In Roman mythology, it was associated with blood, of course, and courage. It was the colour of the god of war, Mars – and the colour of the army. Roman soldiers wore red tunics, while gladiators were adorned in red. Generals wore a scarlet cloak, and to celebrate victories would have their bodies painted entirely in red. Brides at a Roman wedding wore a red shawl, called a flammeum. Red was the colour of blood – but blood was a symbol not just of death, but of life – of fertility and love.

Through the Middle Ages, red was utterly dominant. The emperor Charlemagne painted his palace red, wore red shoes and is even rumoured to have had red hair. In Christian art, it represented the blood of Christ and of Christian martyrs – and became (as it still is) the colour worn by Catholic cardinals.

From the 16th century, a new way of making red appeared in Europe, from cochineal beetles imported by Spanish merchants from the new world. This, naturally, made red terribly fashionable. Don’t hold that against it, though. It passed.

Today, even the most painfully fashionable western bride would be unlikely to walk down the aisle in red. This, though, is the tradition in China, where brides still wear red wedding gowns, and are carried to the ceremony in a red litter. In China, red has always symbolised good fortune and joy - and as a colour of happiness is even banned from funerals. In Greece, Albania and Armenia, too, brides still wear red veils.

Chinese brides also walk down a red carpet. Sound familiar? Not an invention of the Oscars ceremony or the film industry, as you might think. In fact the earliest reference to walking down a red carpet is said to be in the work of Aeschylus, from 458BC. When the eponymous hero Agamemnon returns from Troy, he is greeted by his wife Clytemnestra, who offers him a red path to walk upon. This is no mere coincidence – the meaning is clear:

"Now my beloved, step down from your chariot, and let not your foot, my lord, touch the Earth. Servants, let there be spread before the house he never expected to see, where Justice leads him in, a crimson path."

The red carpet treatment, indeed.

Inextricably linked with its association with brides, flowering and fertility, comes reds shadier side – and the reason those western brides would be unlikely to marry in it. But has the (possibly) oldest colour always been linked with the world’s ‘oldest profession’ and those red light districts? Perhaps not - in fact yellow has been more commonly associated with prostitution. In classic Greece, prostitutes wore saffron-dyed clothes, while in Rome they might dye their hair yellow. It is really a specific shade of red – scarlet – that must carry the can. And that association comes thanks to the bible, and Revelations 17, verses 1-6, where “the Great Harlot” comes “dressed in purple and scarlet”. Purple clearly had a better PR team than poor old scarlet.

That PR team should have sprung into action the minute red started associated with revolutionaries. Long before McCarthy started hunting for “reds under the bed”, the colour started hanging out with some dodgy types. During the French revolution, revolutionaries began wearing red caps and carrying red flags. Red become the colour of the worker’s movement – from the French revolution of 1848, the Paris Commune in 1870 and of socialist parties across Europe. By the 20th century, it was the outright color of revolution – whether Bolshevik or Chinese, adorning flags from Russia, Cuba Vietnam and more.

So red can be both happy, honourable, brave and virginal and, well, quite the opposite – it’s all about the cultural context. But whether you see its innocence or its corruption, it turns out that red actually enhances women’s attractiveness to men. It even enhances the value of a painting – though this is down largely to its symbolic significance in Chinese culture affecting the international art market, rather than anything more, well, primitive.

And though it is hardly rare (it is the most popular colour on national flags, for a start) there is one area in which red is a distinct minority: only 1-2% of the human population has red hair. The colour is produced by the same pigment, pheomelanin, that makes our lips red. Those beautiful redheads have a higher level of that, and less of the dark pigment eumelanin.

In 1888, Vincent Van Gogh wrote that he “sought to express with red and green the terrible human passions”. Ancient, complex and representing extremes – red is nothing if not passionate. Perhaps Van Gogh would have seen red, should he have lived long enough to see the reds in his paintings starting to fade away.

RtK0eE5l.jpg

Toby Stephens’s favourite TV
The Black Sails man on why he digs Better Call Saul and his lifelong love of all things Star Trek

Unmissable show?
Better Call Saul. It’s very different in tone and style from Breaking Bad and yet has some continuity. It starts off incredibly slowly, but it builds, and once you get it, it’s really satisfying. It really exploits that seedy side of the legal system in America, which – as we all know – is totally corrupt. I love the way that it ironises all of that.

Earliest TV memory?
The Clangers. I don’t find them at all comforting, though. I find them quite creepy. I don’t know why: maybe something was going on in my childhood that I can’t remember! There’s something about the theme tune, the sounds.

Bring back…
Star Trek. I’m obsessed with all of the series, even Deep Space Nine. There was something benign about them, and a sort of moral code. Also, it’s total science fiction: if you’re having a shit time, you can put that on and it removes you so entirely from your world. You can get lost in it. I love the JJ Abrams reboot, but I really love the TV version. I kind of hope that maybe in another five, six years they’ll try to reboot it.

Guilty pleasure?
I was filming in South Africa, away from my family, and I’d get back at nights, and just wanted to switch off. They were showing Bear Grylls and River Monsters so I watched them back-to-back. River Monsters has a really loose concept: they’re after some Amazonian fish, and they give you a bogus thing about some kid who’s been snatched by it or something. Very entertaining.

Pitch us a TV show…
I wanted to make a show about a serial bigamist. You’ve got a guy who’s happily married and you think it’s all wonderful and then at the end of the first episode he walks into another house, and he’s got another wife. The idea came from a news story about a guy who had five different wives, and was spinning this big lie. And I thought: “God, the stress levels!” Big Love did something similar but it was all in one house, and I didn’t think it was entirely successful.

gXoB3b3l.jpg

Horgoš, Serbia
Syrians walk along a railway line as they try to cross from Serbia into Hungary.
Photograph: Aris Messinis

T1EOvjBl.jpg

Baikonur, Kazakhstan
A rocket carrying the Soyuz TMA-18M spacecraft with the crew members for the International Space Station lifts off from the cosmodrome
. Photograph: Sergei Ilnitsky

















Wishing you all a great Wednesday morning, afternoon, evening and good luck for tomorrow ! wGHkwn3.gif

dazpicable avatar
Posted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:29
Author: Site FriendET junkieET loverSunTurtle
Thalestris wrote:
Hi everybody ! gHdOO4Y.gif so what's up in the world ... Um, well, you're probably hearing the same horrible stuff than I am so.. I won't talk about those. And after all, I did say that I wouldn't talk twice about those events. Anyways, it's becoming a little bit more difficult everyday to surprise you I must admit vTboF2W.gif I did spot that article about Francis Bacon's life, but damn, I always found his work utterly depressing..so I dropped it. So I'll talk to you about red and Toby Stephens instead. And I've added a few pics and trailers in the end.

UXwwIA5l.jpg

Why red is the oldest colour
From the earliest daubs of our ancestors 17,000 years ago to the red carpet, there are plenty of reasons why one colour rules supreme

If any colour can stake a claim to be the oldest, it is red. We’ve been seeing red (an expression which turns out to be more than just metaphorical) since our neolithic days. It is the most primary of primary colours – the very blood in our veins is red. Except, of course, when it’s blue.

On the earliest daubs of our remote human ancestors, red stole the show. In the caves of Lascaux in France, or Pinnacle Point in South Africa, can be found paintings in an earthy, dusty red. This pigment – along with other colours used – was made from ochre, a family of earth pigments whose name is now, confusingly, most associated with the yellow-brown pigment found in art shops and painting sets. These paintings date back perhaps as far as 15,000BC. Red is ancient indeed.

Many Stone Age graves, too, have been found to contain red ochre. Some experts theorise this was simply to mark the grave, so no one mistakenly dug it up. Others believe it was used to colour the hair, skin or clothes of the buried – either way, it clearly had important ritual significance.

Unsurprisingly, red appears as a symbolic colour in many a warrior setting. In Roman mythology, it was associated with blood, of course, and courage. It was the colour of the god of war, Mars – and the colour of the army. Roman soldiers wore red tunics, while gladiators were adorned in red. Generals wore a scarlet cloak, and to celebrate victories would have their bodies painted entirely in red. Brides at a Roman wedding wore a red shawl, called a flammeum. Red was the colour of blood – but blood was a symbol not just of death, but of life – of fertility and love.

Through the Middle Ages, red was utterly dominant. The emperor Charlemagne painted his palace red, wore red shoes and is even rumoured to have had red hair. In Christian art, it represented the blood of Christ and of Christian martyrs – and became (as it still is) the colour worn by Catholic cardinals.

From the 16th century, a new way of making red appeared in Europe, from cochineal beetles imported by Spanish merchants from the new world. This, naturally, made red terribly fashionable. Don’t hold that against it, though. It passed.

Today, even the most painfully fashionable western bride would be unlikely to walk down the aisle in red. This, though, is the tradition in China, where brides still wear red wedding gowns, and are carried to the ceremony in a red litter. In China, red has always symbolised good fortune and joy - and as a colour of happiness is even banned from funerals. In Greece, Albania and Armenia, too, brides still wear red veils.

Chinese brides also walk down a red carpet. Sound familiar? Not an invention of the Oscars ceremony or the film industry, as you might think. In fact the earliest reference to walking down a red carpet is said to be in the work of Aeschylus, from 458BC. When the eponymous hero Agamemnon returns from Troy, he is greeted by his wife Clytemnestra, who offers him a red path to walk upon. This is no mere coincidence – the meaning is clear:

"Now my beloved, step down from your chariot, and let not your foot, my lord, touch the Earth. Servants, let there be spread before the house he never expected to see, where Justice leads him in, a crimson path."

The red carpet treatment, indeed.

Inextricably linked with its association with brides, flowering and fertility, comes reds shadier side – and the reason those western brides would be unlikely to marry in it. But has the (possibly) oldest colour always been linked with the world’s ‘oldest profession’ and those red light districts? Perhaps not - in fact yellow has been more commonly associated with prostitution. In classic Greece, prostitutes wore saffron-dyed clothes, while in Rome they might dye their hair yellow. It is really a specific shade of red – scarlet – that must carry the can. And that association comes thanks to the bible, and Revelations 17, verses 1-6, where “the Great Harlot” comes “dressed in purple and scarlet”. Purple clearly had a better PR team than poor old scarlet.

That PR team should have sprung into action the minute red started associated with revolutionaries. Long before McCarthy started hunting for “reds under the bed”, the colour started hanging out with some dodgy types. During the French revolution, revolutionaries began wearing red caps and carrying red flags. Red become the colour of the worker’s movement – from the French revolution of 1848, the Paris Commune in 1870 and of socialist parties across Europe. By the 20th century, it was the outright color of revolution – whether Bolshevik or Chinese, adorning flags from Russia, Cuba Vietnam and more.

So red can be both happy, honourable, brave and virginal and, well, quite the opposite – it’s all about the cultural context. But whether you see its innocence or its corruption, it turns out that red actually enhances women’s attractiveness to men. It even enhances the value of a painting – though this is down largely to its symbolic significance in Chinese culture affecting the international art market, rather than anything more, well, primitive.

And though it is hardly rare (it is the most popular colour on national flags, for a start) there is one area in which red is a distinct minority: only 1-2% of the human population has red hair. The colour is produced by the same pigment, pheomelanin, that makes our lips red. Those beautiful redheads have a higher level of that, and less of the dark pigment eumelanin.

In 1888, Vincent Van Gogh wrote that he “sought to express with red and green the terrible human passions”. Ancient, complex and representing extremes – red is nothing if not passionate. Perhaps Van Gogh would have seen red, should he have lived long enough to see the reds in his paintings starting to fade away.

RtK0eE5l.jpg

Toby Stephens’s favourite TV
The Black Sails man on why he digs Better Call Saul and his lifelong love of all things Star Trek

Unmissable show?
Better Call Saul. It’s very different in tone and style from Breaking Bad and yet has some continuity. It starts off incredibly slowly, but it builds, and once you get it, it’s really satisfying. It really exploits that seedy side of the legal system in America, which – as we all know – is totally corrupt. I love the way that it ironises all of that.

Earliest TV memory?
The Clangers. I don’t find them at all comforting, though. I find them quite creepy. I don’t know why: maybe something was going on in my childhood that I can’t remember! There’s something about the theme tune, the sounds.

Bring back…
Star Trek. I’m obsessed with all of the series, even Deep Space Nine. There was something benign about them, and a sort of moral code. Also, it’s total science fiction: if you’re having a shit time, you can put that on and it removes you so entirely from your world. You can get lost in it. I love the JJ Abrams reboot, but I really love the TV version. I kind of hope that maybe in another five, six years they’ll try to reboot it.

Guilty pleasure?
I was filming in South Africa, away from my family, and I’d get back at nights, and just wanted to switch off. They were showing Bear Grylls and River Monsters so I watched them back-to-back. River Monsters has a really loose concept: they’re after some Amazonian fish, and they give you a bogus thing about some kid who’s been snatched by it or something. Very entertaining.

Pitch us a TV show…
I wanted to make a show about a serial bigamist. You’ve got a guy who’s happily married and you think it’s all wonderful and then at the end of the first episode he walks into another house, and he’s got another wife. The idea came from a news story about a guy who had five different wives, and was spinning this big lie. And I thought: “God, the stress levels!” Big Love did something similar but it was all in one house, and I didn’t think it was entirely successful.

gXoB3b3l.jpg

Horgoš, Serbia
Syrians walk along a railway line as they try to cross from Serbia into Hungary.
Photograph: Aris Messinis

T1EOvjBl.jpg

Baikonur, Kazakhstan
A rocket carrying the Soyuz TMA-18M spacecraft with the crew members for the International Space Station lifts off from the cosmodrome
. Photograph: Sergei Ilnitsky

















Wishing you all a great Wednesday morning, afternoon, evening and good luck for tomorrow ! wGHkwn3.gif
The scorch trials, hoping it lives up to expectations.Yes the news is annoying one image floods the world but it happens EVERY day and now i have to listen to insincere politicians making a points scoring exercise on the back of it, sick.
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 16:48
Author: Turtle
[/quote]
The scorch trials, hoping it lives up to expectations.Yes the news is annoying one image floods the world but it happens EVERY day and now i have to listen to insincere politicians making a points scoring exercise on the back of it, sick.[/quote]

Hi Daz gHdOO4Y.gif, yeah I agree with you, as we endure exactly the same hypocritical speech coming from our politicians every day here as well.. ezhz2mF.gif
And for today well, I found this nice portrait of Emma Stone, plus another article and 2 pics and a few trailers, so here we go !

fHihQk7l.jpg

Emma Stone on Woody Allen, whitewashing and why Hollywood pairs her with older men
She’s equally at home in comic-book blockbusters, arthouse fare and awards bait, but could this coolly unflappable screen presence have made her first career missteps by returning to work with Allen on Irrational Man, and courting controversy in Aloha?

In the boiling mid-afternoon heat, Emma Stone looks as cool as you like. There’s no detectable air conditioning, and while I stagger in from the street puce of face and clammy of brow, Stone, as befits a pampered scion of Hollywood, is sitting calmly in a breeze that wafts through the window, peering around the wing of a large cane armchair.

It’s how you expect Stone to present herself, somehow: self-possessed, unflappable, wise beyond her years. She’s only 26, and has been an authentic movie star for just five years – since the release of high-school comedy Easy A in 2010 – but appears to have cycled through the Hollywood gears with apparent nonchalance. Progressing from romcoms (Friends with Benefits, Crazy Stupid Love) to superhero films (The Amazing Spider-Man 1 & 2), from awards bait (The Help, Birdman) to blockbuster cartoons (The Croods), Stone has managed to lodge herself firmly in filmgoers’ consciousness. She somehow projects a sense of chatty, unflappable friendliness with a nicely sardonic edge. Remember when Tina Fey and Amy Poehler had a pop at her (“It’s cute, but it’s creepy”) at last years’ Golden Globes? As a get-out, Stone’s eye-rolling response was about as good as it gets.

Stone has made it so far, so fast, that one of the acting fraternity’s choicest accolades has arrived quickly. I don’t mean an Oscar nomination – though she got one earlier this year, for best supporting actress for Birdman – but a call from Woody Allen’s casting director. Irrational Man, the new movie, is her second Allen in a row, after Magic in the Moonlight; she says she “had a pretty good experience” working on the first one, but snorts with mild derision at the generally-held suspicion that she has become Allen’s new muse, the latest in a long line of recent multi-returnees that includes Scarlett Johannson, Sally Hawkins and Penélope Cruz. “I don’t think he would agree with the muse idea,” she says. “There were two films in a row where the characters, for whatever reason, he wanted me to play them.” Plus, she observes, “he’s working with different people now”.

True: 25-year-old Kristen Stewart has replaced Stone as the junior-fem in Allen’s current film; and anyway, she says, it only “gets attached to the women”. People don’t hang the muse label on the male actors who keep going back to the Allen trough. (You can’t say Allen isn’t an equal-opportunities employer of Hollywood’s younger generation; Stone points out her Zombieland co-star Jesse Eisenberg is putting in a return appearance, and no one has batted an eyelid at that.)

For better or worse she has found herself in a difficult position, cinematically speaking: the focus of Allen’s persistently dubious cinematic instinct, the younger-woman-older-man trope that he just can’t seem to let go. In the 1920s-set Magic in the Moonlight she played a spirit medium who has tender feelings for a man 30 years older than her (Colin Firth); in Irrational Man, she plays a college student who has tender feelings for a man 20 years older than her (Joaquin Phoenix).

So what does Stone think, as a flesher-out of Allen’s narratives? Acknowledging that the chance to act opposite Phoenix “was a pretty big draw ... he’s a truly brilliant actor”, Stone says that playing the lovelorn student didn’t feel weird at all. “I understand all that,” she says, choosing her words carefully. “Just to speak solely of Irrational Man, the relationship is genuinely a plot point. It’s pretty openly discussed in the film that this is a student who is falling in love with her professor, and she wants to bring this intelligence and almost toxic energy into her life.

“I’d also point out that in the next movie I did, with a completely different director, I was with somebody older than Joaquin, and that was never discussed.” (The film in question is Aloha, directed by Cameron Crowe, and the actor in question is Bradley Cooper – who, as it happens, is 40 years old, the same age as Phoenix.) “It’s a Hollywood trope, that’s what we need to discuss. It happens in many movies across the board, and that’s definitely open for discussion. At least in Irrational Man it’s brought attention to. I’ve been in other movies where attention is not brought to it at all.”

Aloha – it turns out – brought its own troubles: a sustained barracking over her casting as a part-Chinese, part-Hawaiian air force pilot called Allison Ng. Stone eventually came off the fence and admitted it probably wasn’t a great idea, saying: “I’ve learned on a macro level about the insane history of whitewashing in Hollywood and how prevalent the problem truly is.

But Aloha – and perhaps Irrational Man – have been rare wobbles in a career that has been impressive in its momentum almost from inception. Born Emily Jean Stone in Arizona in 1988 – the “Emma” came later, when she joined the Screen Actors Guild – she was a self-confessed “shy kid” whose great loosening-up came via improv youth theatre. Her famously husky vocals were the result of colic. After one or two TV guest spots, cinema audiences got their first look at her in Superbad, where she played the girl Jonah Hill accidentally headbutts – her outraged squawk of “What the fuck!” showed that she was a natural fit for the new generation of potty-mouthed teen stars. She showed she wasn’t afraid to play the goof either, donning braces and a frizzy wig for Ghosts of Girlfriends Past, one of those Matthew McConaughey romcoms everyone would probably prefer to forget.

Cameron Crowe, who conducted a lengthy interview with her for Interview magazine in 2011 – presumably well before he cast her in Aloha – called her a “naturalistic” performer, with an “ability to contain competing emotions or sets of circumstances in their performances in the way that people often do in life”. This, you would assume, is what marked her out as able to carry a film in its entirety, as she did with Easy A, and then allowed her to evolve away from comedy to proper drama. The Help, the 2012 picture in which she played a rich kid writing articles about African-American servants in 1960s Mississippi, was her breakthrough in this regard, but it was her casting as Gwen Stacy (opposite soon-to-become boyfriend Andrew Garfield) in the 2012 comic-book blockbuster The Amazing Spider-Man that cemented her status.

She says she never “strategised” her career; that she was just “stubborn” and only accepted the roles “that spoke to me”. The raddled assistant/daughter figure she took on in Birdman, which has arguably gilded her career more than any previous role, she says she fitted in during a month-long break in the middle of the Spider-Man shoot. Comparisons between the giant Hollywood behemoth and the ramshackle indie production were obvious she says. “On a movie like Spider-Man, when there’s such a humongous crew, being cohesive is a more complicated task. When it’s a much lower budget, you are all banded together making the same movie; it’s not like everyone’s off shooting another scene while you’re doing yours. It’s a very different feeling not needing to please markets all around the globe.

Stone says it’s the same deal with Allen, even if he’s rather obviously a different personality type than Birdman’s ebullient Alejandro González Iñárritu. She clearly had a good time making Irrational Man, though I can’t leave without floating the idea that it may no longer be in Hollywood A-listers’ best interests to make themselves quite so available to work with Allen, when even the kindest critic would admit is no longer the directorial force he was. It may have made sense for the likes of Michael Caine, Demi Moore or Sean Penn to give it a go in the 80s or 90s, but what did Ewan McGregor, Colin Firth or Scarlett Johansson actually get out of it?

Stone doesn’t exactly turn frosty, but it’s clear that some things are better left unsaid. “I don’t know that I agree with you there,” she says. “It’s actually just a differing viewpoint.” She “really enjoyed” Vicky Cristina Barcelona and Midnight in Paris, and “loves” Blue Jasmine; I don’t suppose too many people will argue with that, but there’s also been a load of duds, no? “You know, I actually liked quite a few of the films he’s made over the last 15 years.” Shouldn’t he slow down a little? The film-a-year output can’t help. “That’s how he gets through his life. When you make so many, it is what it is, but I think there’s a sense of bravery about it. I really do.”

And with that, time is up, and it’s time to return to the heaving throng in the streets. I feel as if I’ve been a bit mean about Woody, but Stone remains unflappable and diplomatic to the end. She’ll go far.

QKB2e69l.jpg

Japanese town's annual dolphin hunt starts
Controversial six-month hunting season begins in Taiji with a minke whale hunt due to start at the weekend

A small Japanese town kicked off its controversial dolphin hunt on Thursday after bad weather delayed the start, according to a local fisheries official, while a separate whaling hunt was due to start at the weekend.

But the dolphin-hunt boats returned to Taiji’s port – thrust into the global spotlight in the Oscar-winning 2009 documentary The Cove – having failed to trap any of the mammals.

“Twelve boats set out for the hunt, but they returned with no catch,” a Taiji fisheries spokeswoman told AFP.


They will set sail again on Friday if the weather allows, she added.

The six-month season was due to start Tuesday.

In the annual hunt, people from the southwestern town corral hundreds of dolphins into a secluded bay and butcher them, turning the water crimson red.

The scene was featured in The Cove documentary, drawing unwanted attention to the little coastal community.

Environmental campaigners visit the town every year to watch the gruesome event and authorities have boosted their presence to prevent any clashes between locals and activists.

Some of the dolphins are sold to aquariums.


Defenders of the hunt say it is a tradition and point out that the animals are not endangered, a position echoed by the Japanese government.

On Wednesday, Japanese police said that they had released US animal rights activist Ric O’Barry, who trained dolphins for the TV show Flipper, after he was arrested near Taiji for not carrying his passport.

Separately, Japanese fisheries officials have announced they would start an annual coastal whaling hunt with plans to catch 51 minke whales over the next two months, part of what Tokyo says is research but which has attracted strong criticism abroad.

Four ships will operate within a 50km (30-mile) radius off Kushiro in Japan’s northernmost Hokkaido island, the fisheries agency said.

Tokyo argues that the programme is permitted under the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, and is aimed at better understanding whale behaviour.

But Japan’s whaling programme – including another hunt in the Southern Ocean – has angered Western conservationists and many of its friendly nations, including the US.


In June, Japan’s chief whaling negotiator said ships would return to the Antarctic this year, despite a call by global regulators to provide more evidence that the hunt has a scientific purpose.

Despite international disapproval, Japan has hunted whales in the Southern Ocean under an exemption in the global whaling moratorium that allows for lethal research.

Last year, the highest court of the United Nations, the International Court of Justice, ruled that the annual Southern Ocean expedition was a commercial hunt masquerading as science to skirt the international moratorium.

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Chittagong,
Bangladesh A rickshaw makes its way down a flooded street.
Photograph: Jashim Salam

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Nevada, US
A vehicle disguised as a polar bear drives through the dust at Burning Man
.Photograph: Jim Urquhart.

The Gamechangers : The tale of one of the most controversial video games of all time. Director: Owen Harris, Writer: James Wood, Cast: Daniel Radcliffe, Bill Paxton, Joe Dempsie, 2015, Drama, Tv Movie.





Jafar Panahi's Taxi (Taxi): A day with a taxi driver in Teheran. Director: Jafar Panahi, Writer: Jafar Panahi,Cast: Jafar Panahi, 2015, Drama.









The Lobster: In a dystopian near future, single people, according to the laws of The City, are taken to The Hotel, where they are obliged to find a romantic partner in forty-five days or are transformed into beasts and sent off into The Woods. Director: Yorgos Lanthimos, Writers: Yorgos Lanthimos, Efthymis Filippou, Cast: Léa Seydoux, Rachel Weisz, Colin Farrell, 2015, Sci-Fi, Comedy.





wishing you all a great Thursday morning, afternoon, evening and good luck for tomorrow ! wGHkwn3.gif
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 16:39
Author: Turtle
Hi everybody ! gHdOO4Y.gif I hope that you all had a great week ? So, I won't lie to you, I'm kind of tired today and not really inspired.. Then again, you had a lot to read this week um .. So, I'll be cheating a little bit, because I spotted that one yesterday in fact ... I'll take my chances thinking that may be some of you haven't read it yet .. And I'll add 2 pics and 3 trailers. Let's go !

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The original Hollywood Vampires on a night out at the Troubadour in November 1973. From left, Lennon, Anne Murray (whose concert the Vampires attended), Harry Nilsson, Cooper and Micky Dolenz. Michael Ochs

Alice Cooper and Joe Perry on Hollywood Vampires' Drunk History
How two rock legends teamed with Johnny Depp to create an album that paid tribute to Cooper's old drinking club

Alice Cooper and Joe Perry have every right to be jaded. Each has sold millions of records and chalked up hits over several decades. But their eyes still light up when they talk about the recent adventure they shared, recording with one of their childhood heroes.

"Paul McCartney just opened up an instrument case and there's his Hofner, left-handed bass, the most famous guitar in the world," Cooper says, grinning. "We were standing around it like Indiana Jones looking at it, like it's got its own light source and our faces are melting over it."

"I asked him a question about it, and he said, 'Here it is. It's OK. Pick it up,'" the Aerosmith guitarist beams. "I actually got a chance to hold it, and it was like the Holy Grail."

"Paul says, 'It's just a piece of wood,' and starts playing it and I said, 'Holy crap!'" Cooper rejoins in his typically confident manner. "To us, that bass a symbol of how we started."

The rockers have been thinking a lot about how they got started in recent years, while they worked on the debut album by Hollywood Vampires, a supergroup they formed with Johnny Depp (yes, that Johnny Depp). Although the record contains two urgent-sounding bloodthirsty originals — three, if you count the intro, in which late horror icon Christopher Lee recites a passage from Dracula — the heart of it is a collection of gritty, hard-edged covers of songs by the trio's peers and inspirations: the Who, Led Zeppelin, the Doors, Jimi Hendrix, John Lennon and more. McCartney happened to stop by Depp's house, where they were recording, to sing a tune he wrote for Badfinger in 1969, "Come and Get It," and the album — out September 11th — also features guest appearances by Joe Walsh, AC/DC's Brian Johnson, Dave Grohl, Slash and Perry Farrell, among many others. What they all have in common is a set of musical roots.

"We were both the same age when we started playing," the 67-year-old, perennially black-clad and surprisingly perky shock-rocker says, gesturing at Perry, who is three years his junior and looks relaxed with a loose, white scarf around his neck. The musicians are sitting on a couch overlooking Manhattan and, though it's the decidedly un-vampiric hour of 9 a.m., both are sprightly and eager to parse just how all the parts of the project fell into place. "We learned the first two Stones albums, the first two Yardbirds albums, the Kinks," the singer continues. "That's how we learned to play and then we invented Alice Cooper and you invented what Aerosmith was going to be from that. Now, when we're doing these songs, it comes pretty easy."

It also came easy for Depp, age 52, who met Cooper in 2011 on the London set of Dark Shadows, the Tim Burton–directed movie in which the actor portrayed (presciently) a vampire and Cooper played another famous fictional villain: himself. When they got to talking, they realized they had more in common than was apparent, namely a love of British Invasion bands and the blues.

The actor was slugging it out as a guitarist in bands well before making his big-screen debut in 1984's A Nightmare on Elm Street. He'd gotten his first instrument at age 12, stole a chord book, dropped out of high school three years later and eventually moved from Florida to L.A. to open for Iggy Pop and the Talking Heads with a poppy new-wave group called the Kids. Video of them playing the Romantics' "What I Like About You" in 1982 exists online. When Cooper got wind that Depp was still playing, he invited him to join him at a gig at London's 100 Club, where they played "I'm Eighteen" and "School's Out."

"He comes in and he plays with us, and he knows everything," Cooper says emphatically. "No matter what people yelled out, he knew it. 'Brown Sugar?' 'Yeah, yeah.' We realized this guy could play." The actor, who was unavailable for this interview, has in the years since become much more active with music, playing gigs with Marilyn Manson, Aerosmith, Patti Smith and, most recently, Gene Simmons. And after jamming with Cooper, he invited the "Feed My Frankenstein" singer over to his house.

"We started saying, 'Let's do an album,'" he continues. "I'd never done a covers record so I said, 'I'd like to do one in honor of all our dead drunk friends, the guys that we used to drink with that are now gone.'" In the early Seventies, Cooper was a member of a loose-knit drinking club called the Hollywood Vampires that would congregate at the Sunset Strip outpost the Rainbow. "It was Harry Nilsson, John Lennon and Keith Moon and a bunch of guys," Cooper says. "I told Johnny, 'They're all dead now. Let's do an homage to them.'"

As it happened, Perry was staying on Depp's estate at the time, working on his memoir, Rocks: My Life In and Out of Aerosmith, which came out last year. "I was staying literally next door to his studio," says the guitarist, who is soft-spoken compared to Cooper. "So when I would finish working on the book, I would just wander over and they would be doing sessions. Johnny said, 'Hey, you wanna be part of this?' I was like, twist my arm, this was so great. I feel like I'm an honorary member because I was the last guy to join."

"Joe would come down and start playing, and I went, 'There's the band, right there,'" Cooper says. "We've got two guitar players that sing, now we need a drummer and a bass player, and then everybody started emerging. We just rocked it."

The original Hollywood Vampires, Cooper's cronies, took up drinking together in the early Seventies, when Cooper was flying high with hits like "School's Out" and "No More Mr. Nice Guy." His drinking buddies over the years included Jimi Hendrix and Jim Morrison, but at the peak of the Vampires they most included Ringo Starr, the Monkees' Micky Dolenz and songwriter Bernie Taupin, along with Moon, Nilsson and occasionally Lennon. The Rainbow allowed the crew to have their own private loft, which displayed a plaque that proclaimed it "The Lair of the Hollywood Vampires." It listed Cooper, who had a legendary proclivity for imbibing alcohol at the time, as president and Moon as veep.

"The reason we went to the Rainbow every night was to see what Keith was gonna show up as," Cooper says. "He took a lot of time to go out and rent costumes. One day, he shows up and he's in full Queen of England garb." The singer pantomimes Her Royal Highness' grimace and signature dainty wave. "Two weeks later, full-out Hitler, and another night he's fully in drag as a French maid," Cooper recalls. "You're going, 'Wow, this is just another day in his life.'

"He'd wear you out," the singer continues. "If he came to your house and stayed, that week was like, 'Holy crap, I need a vacation,' because he was so intense. He'd stay at my house for two weeks, then he'd go to Harry's for two weeks and then Ringo's for two weeks. Those two weeks would be Hellzapoppin'. But he was also the coolest and funniest guy."

As for the other core members of the club, Dolenz lived next door to Cooper and was also one of the singer's golf buddies, and Taupin was the vocalist's best friend, so they would see each other almost every night. The two Beatles weren't as regular as the others, but attended frequently enough to be members, as did Nilsson. The way to join to the group, as Cooper has bragged, was to out-drink the other members. He explains, that's when he would see what kind of drunks his friends were.

"Everybody's personality changes a little bit when they drink," he says. "I was always the Dean Martin guy; I had the golden buzz, always laughing. I was never the depressed drunk. John and Harry, they would drink, and they could get after each other. If one guy said black, the other guy said white. If one guy said Democrat, the other said Republican. Pretty soon, I'm standing between them going, 'Guys, sit down.' They were the best of friends, but when they drank, they liked to get political and talk about religion and everything else that causes fights. It was funny because neither one was a fighter; they just had a belligerent streak in them every once in a while. Most of the time they were laughing."

Cooper recalls the Hollywood Vampires as having a clubhouse vibe, where only very rarely did these famous musicians talk about music. "We were in music all the time, so if you weren't making an album, you were touring," he says. "If you weren't touring, you were doing something else. So to have a night off from that, the last thing you wanted to talk about was music. You talked about cars and other people."

Photos from one gathering of the Hollywood Vampires, which took place at an Anne Murray concert in November 1973, picture Lennon, Nilsson, Cooper and Dolenz smiling like they were having the times of their lives. Today, the latter two in the photo are the last Vampires standing.

"The last time I saw John Lennon, he said, 'Am I still a Vampire?' I go, 'I smell blood.'" —Alice Cooper
Cooper, who got sober in 1982, looks back at the group's friendships fondly. The last time he saw John Lennon, at one of the former Beatle's concerts before he stopped playing live in the mid-Seventies, is a particularly good memory. "I walked back and he goes, 'Am I still a vampire?'" Cooper recalls. "And I go, 'I smell blood.' And he's, 'I'm a vampire. Yeah!'
"

But he also knows he couldn't keep up with the Vampire lifestyle. "I've thought back on it, 'Well, that was a great time,' even though it was the beginning of the end of my drinking career," Cooper says. "When you're an alcoholic, in the back of your mind, you know that it's a death wish. No matter how you disguise it, every time you have another drink, you're closer to the grave. So to me, being able to survive it, I felt, in some way I should document it."

Johnny Depp plays a mid-paced metallic blues riff on Hollywood Vampires' closing track, which is titled after one of Cooper's favorite turns of phrase lately, "Dead Drunk Friends." "I'm raising my glass and tossing it back but I can't remember why," he sings, "So let's have another for all of my brothers who drank until they died." The song is far from maudlin. In the middle, it turns into a pirate chantey with Cooper, Depp and their blood-sucking brethren getting into the spirit of the original Vampires: "We drink and we fight and we fight and we puke and we puke and we fight and we drink... and then we die."

"I think it came out with a good sense of humor," Cooper says. "It wasn't morbid, I don't think. 'My dead drunk friends,' they would have laughed at that. It was their sense of humor."

Unlike the original Vampires, this collective was a sober affair. Perry and his Aerosmith foil, Steven Tyler, earned the nickname the "Toxic Twins" partly because of their extracurricular partying but both quit drinking in the early Eighties. Depp, who told Rolling Stone in 2013 that he never considered himself an alcoholic ("I don't have the physical need for the drug alcohol," he said), said in the same interview that he hadn't touched the stuff in a year and a half. So the only intoxicant for these Vampires was their music.

The cover tunes chosen by the triumvirate of Cooper, Depp and Perry include big hits ("My Generation," "Whole Lotta Love," "Break on Through"), as well as tunes that don't get much classic-rock radio airplay these days: Small Faces' "Itchycoo Park," Spirit's "I Got a Line on You" and Lennon's "Cold Turkey." As they began recording, with Depp's Kids bandmate Bruce Witkin playing bass on many of the tracks alongside a revolving cast of drummers, which most prominently included Zak Starkey (Ringo's son), the Vampires' friends got wind of the project and offered some helping hands.

One of the guests, AC/DC's Brian Johnson, came into the fold after Cooper conducted an interview with him for his syndicated radio show, Nights With Alice Cooper, last year. The "Welcome to My Nightmare" singer mentioned the project, to which the "Back in Black" vocalist said he wanted to join in on the fun. "I said, 'If you're serious, what song do you want to do?'" Cooper recalls. "He said, 'I want to do "School's Out."' And I went, 'Well, that would be really cool: When he comes in with that voice that's an octave higher than mine, it's going to take it to a whole other level.' He always brings an element of 'What?'"

"You're never gonna do a guitar solo better than Jimmy Page, so let's make it a harmonica solo." —Cooper
The Vampires ended up recording that tune — with help from Slash and original Cooper group bassist Denis Dunaway and drummer Neal Smith — as well as "Whole Lotta Love" with AC/DC's resident screecher. The Led Zeppelin cover holds a special significance to Cooper, since he remembers getting a headlining slot at the Whisky a Go Go in the Sixties only to recognize the opening act's guitarist as a member of the Yardbirds; it was Jimmy Page and the band was Led Zeppelin, and Cooper insisted they headline. The Vampires' "Whole Lotta Love" kicks off with a bluesy, smoldering soul intro with finger snaps and the sort of understated classical strings that defined Isaac Hayes records in the Seventies. Cooper, though, likens it sonically to something the original shock-rocker, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, would do. It features guitar by Joe Walsh, but the most surprising thing about it isn't Johnson's shrieks, it's that the bluesy harmonica playing in the breaks where Jimmy Page would do solos were performed by Alice Cooper himself.

"You're not going to do a guitar solo better than Jimmy Page, so let's make it a harp solo," he says of the rationale. "Jimmy actually heard it and liked it because it's totally the opposite of his. He told [producer] Bob Ezrin he thought it was cool because nobody did that yet."

Cooper says he considers John Bonham a Vampire, though the drummer wasn't a charter member, but says the hardest of the original drinking club members to pay tribute to was Harry Nilsson. "We're all hard-rock guys and Harry was very middle of the road," he says. "We found 'Jump Into the Fire,' and went, 'That works.' And then at the very end, Johnny starts playing 'put the lime in the coconut,' and I went, 'Oh, I love that song. Let's finish with a little bit of that.' So it was that loose. Everybody that came into it brought in what they know and really gave it color."

For the group's covers of the Doors' "Five to One" and "Break on Through," they brought in Doors guitarist Robby Krieger. "He's played with us before and he has a guitar sound that nobody else had," the singer says. "It was like a snake that was running through his guitar. I got a chill in the studio."

"He was a classical guitar player," Perry says. "That's how he started and that's why he fingerpicks with those metal picks. You need to spend a full year learning just how to do that. Apparently, he had only played electric guitar for six months when the Doors hit their stride. They're all jazz guys. The best rockers have that jazz, especially the drummers. There's a vibe about them where they hit the snare drum that really locks things together in a way that the straight-up rock guys lack. That's why a lot of guys in the Eighties came off sounding flat."

Cooper smiles and offers that Moon's drumming idol was Gene Krupa, and that the Who drummer's style was almost exactly the same as the jazz stickman's, save some bass-drum work. "He was the biggest lunatic in the business, but he was still the best drummer in the business," he says.

"I got to see the Who play four or five times in Boston before Woodstock," Perry rejoins. "The whole thing was insane. They were like a ball of fire. I don't think they played two bars the same ever, but it all worked." To create their own drum fireball on their cover of "My Generation," the Vampires recruited Starkey, who has been playing with the Who on their recent Who Hits 50 tour, and he gamely fills in for Moon with crashing cymbals and a firm respect for keeping the rhythm in the pocket.

Each guest came into the project for different reasons but in the case of McCartney, Cooper thinks the Beatle took an interest in the project because of its connection to Lennon. While working with him, the band treated McCartney to an old-school approach to recording. "Everybody was in the studio and we recorded live, the way they would have done in 1964," Perry says. "Very few bands do that anymore. They're always afraid that somebody is going to make a mistake. But Paul walked in and sat down at the piano. He ran through it maybe three four times at the piano, no notes, nothing, and the three of us [Vampires] were in a row watching. Alice, Johnny, me, we've all got our own claims to fame, our own journeys, but man, the three of us looked at each other and our chins were down here." He gestures to his knees.

"You know what was great for me?" Cooper says, lifting his chin. "The second time through, he made a mistake. It's like Tiger shanking a ball — that doesn't happen. And he goes, 'Wait, wait, wait, let me start that again.' And I went, 'Wow, I just saw Paul McCartney make a mistake.' But when he got it, Bob Ezrin went, 'That was on the money.' Then Paul turns around and goes, 'Do you want me to play bass on this?' We all go, 'No, Paul, we have a better bass player than you.'" Cooper laughs. "'Of course, we want you to play bass on it!'" That's when the bassist blew their minds.

Perhaps the most surprising guest on the album, though, is actor Christopher Lee, who played roles ranging from Dracula to Lord of the Rings' Saruman and recorded his own brand of heavy-metal albums before his death at age 93 this past June. Like Depp, he met Cooper on set of Dark Shadows, in which he played a fisherman. They took to golfing together. "He was a good, solid player," the singer says of the actor's golf game. Previously, Cooper had drafted Vincent Price to add a voiceover to his Welcome to My Nightmare album, and he thought with the Hollywood Vampires that it would be nice to have "one of those classic voices" on the record for a track called "The Last Vampire."

"His words are from the pages of Bram Stoker's Dracula," the singer says, pronouncing the author's first name as "Braahm." "The passage ends with 'Children of the night, what music they make.' I think it was the very last thing he did on tape, which was tragic and historic at the same time."

The vocalist pauses for effect and continues. "There's one little bit of the tape that we took off and I kept," he says. "After he said, 'what music they make,' he said, 'I dread to think what Alice is going to do with this.' I kept that."

The other original tune on Hollywood Vampires, "Raise the Dead," kicks in right after Lee recites his ominous line with thunderous drums, heavy guitar and Cooper yowling his own menacing observation: "The soul of rock & roll was buried in a hole." When Rolling Stone asks if he really believes that, the singer demurs. "Well, by the soul, I mean the Brian Joneses, the Jim Morrisons, the guys that really created bands like us, they're buried in a hole, but they're not dead — because we've raised the dead," he says. "Physically they died, but we're not going to let their music die.

"One of the reasons we did this album was to remind everybody about these songs," he continues. "They don't get played on FM radio. You never hear [T. Rex's] 'Jeepster.' You never hear 'Itchycoo Park.' You never hear 'Manic Depression.' You're going to hear what the computer spits out, but you're never going to hear those deeper cuts that I feel were the cooler cuts."

The record serves another purpose, too, in his mind. "It's almost a little educational piece for kids that are 18, 19 and in bands right now," he says. "We're saying, 'Hey, don't forget this song and that song.' I'm hoping there are 16-year-old kids right now in a garage learning old Alice songs and old Aerosmith songs. To me, that's the future of rock & roll."

Although the Hollywood Vampires won't be proselytizing new fans in the name of rock on a lengthy tour, they might be able to inspire a few disciples at the handful of gigs they have planned. The band will play two shows on the Sunset Strip — home to the original Vampires — at the 500-person capacity club the Roxy on September 16th and 17th. Then, on September 24th, they will play the Rock in Rio festival in Brazil. The rhythm section for these gigs will consist of Velvet Revolver and former Guns N' Roses members, bassist Duff McKagan and drummer Matt Sorum.

"If any guy is allowed to make an album about his dead drunk friends, it would be me." —Cooper
The group will use those concerts as an opportunity to play a few tunes that they didn't put on the record, too. When Cooper was sketching out a set list recently, Perry and Depp called him up asking to play his 1973 tango-inflected single "Billion Dollar Babies." "I said, 'Really? You know I'm not dead yet,'" he says with a laugh. "They said, 'Yeah, but let's do that and "Train Kept a-Rollin'," for an encore,' and I said, 'Absolutely.' I thought doing 'Billion Dollar Babies' was a nice compliment to me. They didn't have to do that. They could have said 'Brown Sugar.' In fact, I was the one who said, 'OK, let's do that, but let's finish with "Brown Sugar."'"

Cooper does not take the fact that he's "not dead yet," as he puts it, for granted. His drinking escapades are well documented, but he still remembers the wake-up call a doctor gave him after he threw up blood. "He told me, 'If you want to join your buddies — your "Hollywood Vampires" — I'll give you another month,'" the singer says. "'Just keep going how you're going and you'll be with them.' And I went, 'Uhh.' He said, 'You have a choice of stopping or joining them.'

"At that point, I said, 'I'm a little tired of this,'" he continues. "And I didn't really want to die. I guarantee you, Steven Tyler, Ozzy, Iggy, all the guys that are still here went through that decision. That's why we're all still here."


In the context of this incarnation of the Hollywood Vampires — less a drinking club than a sober social club these days — the people who are still here and those who are not remain paramount to Cooper. The album may run only 49 minutes, but to him, it spans generations. This time, he's metaphorically pouring one out for the departed. After all, this is a celebration. "If any guy is allowed to make an album about his dead drunk friends, it would be me," he says, as confident and resolute as ever. "Thirty-three years ago, I came as close to joining them as possible without doing it. I'm a survivor."

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Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Women in traditional dress take part in a cultural festival.
Photograph: Igor Kovalenko

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London, England
The Rising Tide, an installation by the sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor, is consumed by the waters of the Thames
. Photograph: Ben Pruchnie

Amazing Grace : Director: Sydney Pollack, Cast: Aretha Franklin, 2015, Documentary.





Green Room : A young punk rock band find themselves trapped in a secluded venue after stumbling upon a horrific act of violence. Director: Jeremy Saulnier, Writer: Jeremy Saulnier, Cast: Imogen Poots, Patrick Stewart, Alia Shawkat, 2015, Horror.









Wishing you all a great Friday , morning, afternoon, evening and a nice week end !! wGHkwn3.gif




















Thalestris avatar
Posted: Sat Sep 05, 2015 16:51
Author: Turtle
Hi everybody !! gHdOO4Y.gif So I do hope that you're all enjoying that Saturday ? !! And I was like thinking this morning.. Getting up real late, nah today, no post !! I'm just resting, no newspapers ,no news, no nothing , just silence !! Ah ah, and, I can't help it ! And you know what I'm so glad that I did !! Damn curiosity ! And I'm so happy to share that with you today !! Does the Black Keys rings a bell um ? I actually don't know how I could miss that one in August.. Well, Dan Auerbach is also in The Arcs now and their album was released yesterday .. "Outta my mind" I'm already a huge fan of that guy, but now, I just adore him really, that album is a treat !

And I'll put also that article about that photographer, this one will arrive probably a bit too late and you will all have read it already um ? I do have a few pics and a few trailers too. Ok then, I hope that you'll enjoy !

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Adam Hinton has photographed the most dangerous places in the world, none more so than El Salvador, where the MS-13 gang welcomed him gladly into their community and their private prison

Adam Hinton is one of those people who, after just a few minutes, you feel you’ve known all your life. It is an attribute every photographer needs – the ability to put subjects at ease – but it can also be a life-saver. Literally so, in Hinton’s case, as he has worked in some of the most dangerous places in the world.

People relax very quickly with me,” Hinton says. “I was with a gang in El Salvador, and after half an hour they said, ‘Do you want to come round the back with us?’ That might have freaked other people out, but they seemed pretty chilled, so I did it. They started smoking dope, then got a gun out. My fixer said afterwards, ‘I’ve never seen that happen within a fortnight [of the first meeting], but it happened to you in a few minutes.’ I don’t go into those situations looking over my shoulder, or looking really panicky. I’m sometimes a bit naively oblivious to what’s going on.

El Salvador is the latest stage in 50-year-old Hinton’s edgy photographic journey. His day job is in advertising – taking crunchy, sweaty shots for Adidas, Nike and Sport England, as well as for the British army and many charities. But when he’s not shooting ad campaigns, he heads to the world’s trouble spots – not to take photographs on commission, which he says he finds too restrictive, but to do personal photo-essays.

His odyssey began in Donetsk in the early 90s in the wake of the collapse of the Soviet Union. “I went to photograph coalminers, who were heroes of the proletariat and were no longer going to be that. I was interested in how that society was going to change.” He got to know a family in the region, and went back and forth for three years, photographing the community around them. “That became the blueprint for my projects: to work with some families, then discover the community through them.”

Since then he has travelled to Gaza, Egypt, Indonesia, the Philippines, India, Venezuela, Brazil and all over Africa. Much of his personal work over the past decade has focused on the slums of the developing world, and it was as part of that project that, in 2013, he undertook one of his more dangerous trips: to El Salvador, the central American country reputed to have the highest murder rate in the world.

Until he went there, Hinton had avoided documenting gang culture. “Everyone does gangs,” he says, “and my idea was to show that 95% of the people in favelas are normal people.” But when he heard on the BBC World Service that the two big rival gangs in El Salvador – Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13) and 18 Street (Barrio 18) – had agreed a truce, he hoped it would give him space to understand the reasons behind the shootings; to see the people, not the guns.

The truce is now over and the violence deadlier than ever, but in that brief lull, Hinton spent a week in the Las Victorias district of San Salvador, the country’s capital, and visited Penal de Ciudad Barrios – a prison exclusively for members of MS-13. It is guarded outside by the army, but inside, the 2,600 inmates (in a prison built for 800) have free run of the squalid facility, because the guards are too scared to enter. The prisoners have their own bakery, workshops making furniture and toys, and even a rudimentary hospital that they staff themselves.

Hinton has produced an elegant new book with 20 portraits of the heavily tattooed prison inmates. I tell him I find their expressions hostile and disturbing, but he demurs. “I find their faces quite passive,” he says. “They were really warm to me. We just sat and joked.” He says he was completely safe in the prison because he’d been invited in by the gang bosses who run it. Gang law rules. As well as the book, Hinton has posted other photographs he took in the prison and in Las Victorias on his website, plus a short film.

I’d always avoided gangs,” he says, “but noticed in Brazil how integrated they were with the favela society. It’s a love-hate relationship: they’d be better off without them, but need them to protect themselves from other gangs and from the police. I wanted to go to El Salvador and talk to gang members, but not about ‘How brutal are you? How many guys have you killed?’ None of that knucklehead stuff. I just wanted to ask why they joined the gangs and what the gangs did.

MS-13 and Barrio 18 originated among Salvadoran exiles who, in the 1980s, fled the civil war and settled in Los Angeles. When the war ended in 1992, they were sent back to El Salvador, and brought gang culture with them. Hinton wants to foreground the story of the civil war and the class conflict that still rages in El Salvador. He doesn’t present gangs as mindlessly violent; their violence springs from an impoverished, divided society. One reason he avoids commissions is that he doesn’t want other people’s narratives imposed on him; he prefers to develop his own.

In Las Victorias, Hinton had lunch with a gang leader who had just had a young informant killed; attended the wake for a stillborn child who had died because his mother, in prison on a drugs charge, was not allowed to go to hospital in time for the delivery; and witnessed the funeral of a man, not a member of MS-13, who was shot by Barrio 18 just because he lived in an MS-13 district. “I found it shocking that here I am, in a truce, in this community for a week, and they have two gang-related deaths.

It’s not the violence he wants to emphasise, but the suffering and humanity of most of the residents of Las Victorias. “Rather than seeing these places as threats and full of bad people, my idea is to say: here’s a family; they want the same things as we do; they want a job, a decent home, a better life for their kids. There are basic human needs that everyone has the right to. A lot of my sympathies are with these gang members. They’re there; they’re trapped; there’s nothing else they can do.

Hinton had a poor and dysfunctional upbringing in south-west London. His mother, who worked behind a bar, was a schizophrenic who was imprisoned for stabbing another woman. He resists the reductionist notion that his background feeds his desire to document the suffering of the marginalised, but it’s hard to avoid. It certainly helps to explain how he can have lunch with murderous gang bosses and not panic when guns are brandished. “One of the reasons I don’t get freaked out in those situations,” he says, “is because of the things I saw when I was younger.

I ask him whether the personal projects keep him sane amid all the commercial work. “They’re what keep me sane, full stop,” he says. “I’m driven to do them, and there’s the hope that they will somehow make a difference. But maybe I’m being naive.

zvNNpM7l.jpg

Dan Auerbach's the Arcs will release their debut LP, Yours, Dreamily, on September 4th, and today the Black Keys singer exclusively shares a live take on his latest project's "Stay in My Corner." The slow-burning rocker, inspired by the recent Floyd Mayweather–Manny Pacquiao fight, was recorded in L.A. at the Village Recorder.

"This was at the tail end of a whirlwind week for us," Auerbach told Rolling Stone of the "Stay in My Corner" performance. "We had just played our very first show ever in Boyle Heights. It was to celebrate our friend Omar Juarez on his art show and his completion of our very first music video. We were all very much still learning the songs at this point, but even still, this week had a very celebratory feeling to it overall... I'm reminded of all that good stuff when I see this performance."

The Arcs feature Auerbach pals Leon Michels, Richard Swift, Homer Steinweiss and Nick Movshon, along with guests Kenny Vaughan and all-female mariachi group Mariachi Flor de Toloache.

"These guys have equal input on all the songs," Auerbach previously told Rolling Stone of the Arcs' collaborative nature. "It's a completely different thing than the Black Keys, where I write the lyrics, the chords and most of the melodies. Every song on this record is co-written with the whole band. That's why I didn't call it my name. I love being able to sit back and let songs evolve without me. It's been a new experience."

"Stay in My Corner" and the similarly boxing-related "Tomato Can" were released as a seven-inch single in May. The studio version of the former track, along with "Outta My Mind," was also offered up as an instant download for fans who preordered Yours, Dreamily. Auerbach also told Rolling Stone that the Arcs expect to embark on a two-month tour this fall.

Yours, Dreamily Track List

1. "Once We Begin (Intro)"
2. "Outta My Mind"
3. "Put a Flower in Your Pocket"
4. "Pistol Made of Bones"
5. "Everything You Do (You Do for You)"
6. "Stay in My Corner"
7. "Cold Companion"
8. "The Arc"
9. "Nature's Child"
10. "Velvet Ditch"
11. "Chains of Love"
12. "Come & Go"
13. "Rosie (Ooh La La)"
14. "Searching the Blue"













BUS4Ua9l.jpg

Lobamba, Swaziland
‘Maidens’ carry reeds as they sing during the annual royal reed dance at the Ludzidzini royal palace. The ceremony is an annual cultural event where tens of thousands of girls travel from various chiefdoms to the royal village to participate in the eight-day festival
. Photograph: Gianluigi Guercia

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Cotopaxi, Ecuador
The Cotopaxi volcano is photographed from El Pedregal, Ecuador. Its last major eruption was in 1877
.
Photograph: Dolores Ochoa

Pay the Ghost: A professor frantically searches for his son who was abducted during a Halloween parade. Director: Uli Edel, Writers: Tim Lebbon (novel), Dan Kay (screenplay), Cast: Nicolas Cage, Sarah Wayne Callies, Alex Mallari Jr., 2015, Thriller.





The Lady in the Van: A man forms an unexpected bond with a transient woman living in her car that's parked in his driveway. Director: Nicholas Hytner, Writer: Alan Bennett, Cast: Maggie Smith, James Corden, Dominic Cooper, 2015, Drama.





Wishing you all a great Saturday and a relaxing Sunday ! Have fun ! 0SUUfVl.gif

dazpicable avatar
Posted: Sun Sep 06, 2015 10:06
Author: Site FriendET junkieET loverSunTurtle
Nice post,love The Black Keys had tickets for Manchester they cancelled damaged his neck i think something like that very dissapointed,nice taster tracks there Thalestris.Going to see the Courteneers in December https://youtu.be/XhLBAkR5JbI?t=87 have a listen not a bad back catalogue saw them support The stereophonics in 2008 great live band ,have a great day hope weather is as nice as here, sunshine and barbies all the way.

Thalestris avatar
Posted: Sun Sep 06, 2015 12:17
Author: Turtle
dazpicable wrote:
Nice post,love The Black Keys had tickets for Manchester they cancelled damaged his neck i think something like that very dissapointed,nice taster tracks there Thalestris.Going to see the Courteneers in December https://youtu.be/XhLBAkR5JbI?t=87 have a listen not a bad back catalogue saw them support The stereophonics in 2008 great live band ,have a great day hope weather is as nice as here, sunshine and barbies all the way.

Hi Daz gHdOO4Y.gif, ah sorry to hear that you couldn't see The Black Keys in concert damn.. Then again, I missed the Arctic Monkeys last year as well .. So it happens, um ah ah .. You'll be more lucky with The Courteneers I'm sure and thanks for telling me about it, I'll check .. wGHkwn3.gif And yes indeed, the weather is fantastic here too !! So my ET friends , no post today, my brain needs some fresh air .. But wishing you all a lovely Sunday !! xR0G40N.gif

sbb8I6ml.jpg
ange1 avatar
Posted: Mon Sep 07, 2015 12:47
Author: ModeratorET lover
Thalestris wrote:
dazpicable wrote:
Nice post,love The Black Keys had tickets for Manchester they cancelled damaged his neck i think something like that very dissapointed,nice taster tracks there Thalestris.Going to see the Courteneers in December https://youtu.be/XhLBAkR5JbI?t=87 have a listen not a bad back catalogue saw them support The stereophonics in 2008 great live band ,have a great day hope weather is as nice as here, sunshine and barbies all the way.

Hi Daz gHdOO4Y.gif, ah sorry to hear that you couldn't see The Black Keys in concert damn.. Then again, I missed the Arctic Monkeys last year as well .. So it happens, um ah ah .. You'll be more lucky with The Courteneers I'm sure and thanks for telling me about it, I'll check .. wGHkwn3.gif And yes indeed, the weather is fantastic here too !! So my ET friends , no post today, my brain needs some fresh air .. But wishing you all a lovely Sunday !! xR0G40N.gif

sbb8I6ml.jpg

Hello Thalestris, daz and all :) Hope you all had a great Weekend, Weather was not so good till Sunday... Sun back and a lot warmer :)
Aww i don't have the time go to any more concerts but hey one day again maybe. Lucky if i get to go to the cinema unless there is a HORROR i really want to see on the big screen :)
Wish you all a great Monday
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