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The Pirate Gazette (closed)



[Prev]  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 21, 22, 23 ... 46, 47  [Next]
Page 22 of 47   [ 691 posts ]
AuthorMessage
ange1 avatar
Posted: Thu Nov 05, 2015 17:24
Author: ModeratorET lover
Thalestris wrote:
Hi ange, Daz, Abhi and everybody ! I hope that you had all a great month ? So I'm back from my crazy trip .. but still adjusting .. bloody time difference : 12 hours.. and sick as well, sneezing, coughing...um.. But as soon as I can think straight again, I promise to post a little something here once in a while..

But, I did spot that trailer just now !





Wishing you all a great Thursday morning, afternoon, evening, and good luck for tomorrow !

Awww lovely to see you back Thalestris, hope you had a wonderful time and i had a great Month thank you. Hope you feel better soon, keep warm and plenty rest. Look after yourself hun :)
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Fri Nov 06, 2015 17:10
Author: Turtle
Hi ange and everybody !! And I just can't help it thinking about posting something here and sharing ... My eyesight is still a bit blurry ,but what else can you do when you're sick apart from screening all the great uploads from ET and I do have a lot to catch up and reading & watching the news .. um.... ? So .. the plane crash obviously... it's all over the news.. and like everybody else, I'm waiting for that proof .. Meanwhile, I say hello to our ET Russian & Ukrainian friends today, and send my full support to those who have lost someone in that tragic event.

And so what did I read today ? Well that article, and I've spotted a few pics and a few trailers as well.

jJcR9A7l.jpg

(The Last Man on Earth)

Loneliness is not a private matter

In our market society, isolation is the price people pay for being on a low income, and having lots of face-to-face contact is a new form of privilege

Headlines about the health effects of loneliness are getting more frequent. But these articles always strike me as odd. Loneliness is associated with poor health; but poor health can be the result of loneliness, rather than the cause. It’s like talking about the effects of a fire without ever mentioning the person with the match.

We have trouble talking about the causes of loneliness. The condition is usually presented as a mix of bad luck, genetics, and other factors too ephemeral to pin down. But the notion of loneliness as inexplicable isn’t true.

One factor that’s been consistently linked to loneliness is income. Here’s how it works: as your income falls, you get lonelier. An Australian study showed that people earning less than $600 a week were significantly lonelier than those earning over $1,000 per week. A large Dutch study came to the same conclusion: people with low incomes were twice as likely to be lonely and six times more likely to be socially isolated.

Researchers have become so interested in the relationship between loneliness and income that they’ve started studying it in the abstract. What happens if you give someone 80 $100 bills to count, and then exclude them from a team game? They don’t really care. What if you give them 80 blank pieces of paper, and then exclude them? They feel rotten.

Academics explain this in terms of “financial resources promoting social participation”. At a very basic level, this means that if you have a lot of disposable income, you can spend it on group activities, like yoga classes and wine-tasting clubs. But it also means more than that.

We live in a culture where it’s increasingly difficult to find ways to connect for free. We devalue and underfund libraries, parks and community centres. We commodify neighbourhoods, and then ask those who can no longer afford them to leave. We pull away from traditional sources of inclusion such as unions, places of worship, and groups such as the parent-teacher association (PTA). You might celebrate the death of the PTA – but that still leaves you with the prospect of people riding buses all day because they have no other way to connect.


It’s not just low incomes that cut people off from increasingly market-oriented sociability. My local paper, the Toronto Star, just introduced readers to the word “precarity”, or unsteady employment in all its forms: freelance work, flipped contracts and jobs with constantly changing shifts.

I’ve come to think that, when it comes to loneliness, precarious employment may be worse than having no job at all. If you’re not working, you might be able to rally yourself to volunteer at a community garden or animal shelter. If your schedule is constantly changing, or if you’re in a panic about landing your next freelance gig, you might be too anxious to do anything.

The London School of Economics sociologist Richard Sennett calls this “economically induced withdrawal” – you’ve got so much uncertainty in your life that your appetite for going out and meeting new people is basically nil.

Experts have been linking economic inequality and social inequality for a long time, arguing that healthy social networks and a lot of face-to-face contact are new forms of privilege – with the rich having more of them and the rest of us having less. At a policy level, though, we’re still not connecting the dots. An old church near me was just converted into condos without anyone asking if there was a way of relocating the communal space. Welfare is discussed without any reference to people’s ability to cook for others or meet a friend for coffee.

Socialising is increasingly seen as a “perk” – if you have the resources for that pilates class, then by all means enjoy it; if you don’t, then deal with feelings of isolation on your own. But loneliness and sociability are not private issues. Even if you have a steady job, you’re not going to see much of your friends if they’re maxed out searching for work.

Once your neighbours leave for cheaper locations, they’re gone for good. And we all suffer when people retreat from public life: it’s not much of a party if you’re the only one showing up.

It’s time to start linking the health effects of loneliness to the causes of loneliness. We know that loneliness piggybacks on low incomes, precarious work and unemployment. These issues are more clear cut than the health effects of loneliness: requiring predictable work hours is a lot simpler than halting the effects of dementia.

It’s also time to recognise that rising inequality has a social edge. Increasingly, people with low or even middle-incomes have fewer social opportunities. But belonging and inclusion support our emotional, physical and mental health. We shouldn’t have to buy them, we shouldn’t have to scrimp, and we shouldn’t have to watch some people participate fully while so many are being left out.

7nhrUHEl.jpg

Thousands of protesters, many wearing Guy Fawkes mask, gathered in London on Bonfire night to take part in the Million Mask march and demonstrate against the government’s austerity cuts and increased state surveillance. Demonstrators make their way past the Houses of Parliament
Photograph: Dominic Lipinski.


UNj0DYFl.jpg

Extraordinary photographs of a huge shelf cloud hitting the coast of New South Wales, Australia. The meteorological event – technically a type of arcus cloud – is a wedge of cloud formed at the leading edge of a thunderstorm where the downdraft and an updraft of the storm intersect. The shelf cloud seen here – dubbed by Twitter a ‘cloud tsunami’ – measured several kilometres in length and swept across the city throughout the afternoon and early evening.

TyXyC9il.jpg

Buenos Aires, Argentina
A demonstrator wearing a skirt participates in a march against gender violence. The protest was organised by social networks with the slogan “Wear the skirt if you are a male”
Photograph: Xinhua






















Wishing you all a great week end !! Have fun !! And don't catch cold like me ... t8oztMM.gif

and I bring a birthday cake for my lovely friend Ange !! 8dOmi6C.gif 4j8W6MV.gif






ange1 avatar
Posted: Sun Nov 08, 2015 13:46
Author: ModeratorET lover
Thank you for the Birthday Cake my lovely friend, sorry i am a little late. Hope you are feeling better today and wish you a great Sunday :)
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 17:35
Author: Turtle
Hi ange, thanks for your support and your wishes .. Damn flu, I'm still struggling.. 6HzmNuZ.gif but eventually I'll be fine again.. So today.. um.. I did read a few things, but I was thinking.. Ok everybody knows that we've reached + 1C recently on Earth.. And that the atmosphere is suffocating in some big cities in China .. So I chose that old interview of Clive Owen instead. (June 2015). I just can"t post depressive news in here all the time ,otherwise I'll just lose you for good ! So Clive Owen it is, a few pics and just 2 trailers um..

3L58T8sl.jpg

'The Knick's Clive Owen On Dr. Thackery & Season Two: “We Left Him In A Pretty Desperate State”

From its opening bloody scene in a 1900-era hospital operating theater, to the drug-addled end of season one, The Knick spared no one—much like the expansive and industrial era in American history that it depicts. At the blackened heart of the Steven Soderbergh-directed series stands Clive Owen as the crazed and brilliant Dr. John Thackery. Taking over as the head of New York City’s Knickerbocker Hospital surgery staff following the suicide of his mentor, Thackery sought to drag the barbarism of medical treatment into the dawn of modern medicine, while trying to wrestle his own demons in what was a true chef d’oeuvre performance by the Children of Men actor. “I got some incredible feedback from friends and peers that liked it or really loved it,” says Owen of his portrayal and the 10-episode first season of the Cinemax series. Not only did The Knick put the premium cabler on the serious drama block, but it also put Owen solidly back on the Emmy contender path just three years after his first nomination in 2012 for HBO’s Hemingway & Gellhorn. With the series renewed for a second season just before its August debut last year, and production on that cycle now recently completed, Owen has become a de facto New Yorker—at least in the NYC of the early 20th century.

The Knick has won a Peabody in its first season and been nominated for Golden Globe and WGA awards. What does Dr. Thackery bring to you?

There’s nothing more exciting for me as an actor than to play this high-wire role. Thackery’s somebody who is challenging, kind of brilliant, but also in some areas, really difficult. In season two of The Knick we definitely continue that high-wire walk but it feels bigger and more epic, too.

From Thackery’s drug habit, to the sex, the cadavers, the changing urban world, race relations, and the violence, The Knick takes place in the opening years of the 20th century but really isn’t your typical white flannel suit period piece, is it?

Well, often in period pieces what we’re looking at is a very polite version of what life might have been like then. In The Knick, I think New York is a really tough place to be. There’s something that I think is so visceral and relatable about this period piece, which is different from a lot of them. There’s this world of medicine, what they were learning, and how they were learning it. They were making huge strides but it’s shocking and wild to think about the things they saw then, and the way they approached treating people.

The fictional Knickerbocker Hospital has become quite bleak by the end of the first season, as has Thackery himself—does he go further into the darkness in season two?

We left him in a pretty desperate state and it’s a question of him picking himself up and trying to get himself back together again. This season we go outside of the hospital much more. He goes off in some very interesting areas but he still tries to tread the line, which is the reason I was sort of attracted to him in the first place.

You’ve said that one of the reasons you were attracted to The Knick was so that you could work with Steven Soderbergh. What was it like for you both, coming back for a second season?

Steven and I got really used to the way each other worked. I’ve gotten much more comfortable and understood the way he did things. So by the time we started again, we’d put so much groundwork into this story, and the characters, and we’ve taken the people quite far enough in that first season to be able to just pick it up and push it further. But we also hit the ground running because there’s a very well organized crew and good way of doing things. So it felt like the first day was just picking up exactly where we left off, and there’s something really great about that.

It sounds like you view the show as a real collaboration with him.

One great thing about Steven is he knows quality when he sees it. And the people he surrounds himself with are of such high quality. Everywhere you look on the show you are dealing with top people. He’s also a brilliant delegator in lots of ways. He lets people who really know what they’re doing do their thing.

Does that include you, too?

For me there is a great feeling that you’re part of something that’s genuinely pushing the boundaries. It’s so exciting to be in something I think is of such high quality. With really great writing, the show goes into dark areas that I think haven’t really been looked into before. Generally, in television at the moment, the potential to do that is there. It’s challenging but I think it’s a pretty bold television show. We really committed and we created something pretty unique.

pBpx2Zal.jpg

Yangon, Myanmar
Aung San Suu Kyi arrives at a polling station to cast her vote in the first free nationwide election for 25 years
Photograph: Lam Yik Fei


4TrtRX8l.jpg

A dead Saiga antelope lies on a field in the Zholoba area of Kostanay, Kazakhstan where scientists are struggling to explain why half of world’s rare antelope population died within weeks
Photograph: Kazakhstan's Ministry of Agriculture.










Wishing you all a great Monday morning, afternoon, evening and good luck for tomorrow ! 8dOmi6C.gif
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Tue Nov 10, 2015 17:14
Author: Turtle
Hi everybody ! I hope that you all had a great start of the week ? So as for today : One article, a few pics, plus some trailers ( movie & tv show ). So here we go.

UoEMQTF.gif

njNyXsS.gif

Indonesia plans to use crocodiles to guard death row drug convicts

In echoes of the Bond film Live and Let Die, the country’s anti-drugs chief is backing the plan because ‘you can’t convince them to let criminals escape’

Indonesia’s anti-drugs agency has proposed building a prison on an island guarded by crocodiles to hold death row drug convicts, an official has said, an idea seemingly taken from a James Bond film.

The proposal is the pet project of anti-drugs chief Budi Waseso, who plans to visit various parts of the archipelago in his search for reptiles to guard the jail.

We will place as many crocodiles as we can there. I will search for the most ferocious type of crocodile,” he was quoted as saying by local news website Tempo.

Waseso said that crocodiles would be better at preventing drug traffickers from escaping prison as they could not be bribed – unlike human guards.

You can’t bribe crocodiles. You can’t convince them to let inmates escape,” he said.

But he is banking on the convicts lacking the crocodile-running skills shown by Roger Moore’s 007 in the Bond movie Live and Let Die when he escapes from an island using the reptiles as stepping stones.

The plan is still in the early stages, and neither the location or potential opening date of the jail have been decided.

Indonesia already has some of the toughest anti-narcotics laws in the world, including death by firing squad for traffickers, and sparked international uproar in April when it put to death seven foreign drug convicts, including Australians Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran.

But president Joko Widodo has insisted that drug dealers must face death as the country is fighting a “national emergency” due to rising narcotics use.

Despite the harsh laws, Indonesia’s corrupt prison system is awash with drugs, and inmates and jail officials are regularly arrested for narcotics offences.

Anti-drugs agency spokesman Slamet Pribadi confirmed authorities were mulling the plan to build “a special prison for death row convicts”.

He said only traffickers would be kept in the jail, to stop them from mixing with other prisoners and potentially recruiting them to drug gangs.

The agency is currently in discussions with the justice ministry about the plan, he added.

xBUQbfPl.jpg

Barra de Navidad, Mexico
Mexico’s navy heads an operation to remove hazardous waste and transfer fuel and oil from the cracked hull of the Los Llanitos after it ran aground during hurricane Patricia.
Photograph: Enrique Perez Huerta
.

Jnh2l0Nl.jpg

Valparaiso, Chile
Tattoo artist and body modifier Emilio Gonzalez takes a picture of Eduardo Henriquez’s eyeball tattoo during the Latin American Convention of Tattoo and Suspension.
Photograph: Rodrigo Garrido.


















Wishing you all good morning, good afternoon, good evening and good luck for tomorrow ! 8dOmi6C.gif
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Wed Nov 11, 2015 17:58
Author: Turtle
Hi everybody ! So it was Armistice Day here as well.. Meaning that nobody was working. Apart from that , I chose that fresh interview of Woody Harrelson for you , hoping that you haven't all read it yet um? Plus a few pics and 2 trailers , but one amongst those 2 is really special I think and the movie should be interesting...

Co0HnBFl.jpg

Woody Harrelson interview: 'We live in a completely corrupted world'

His father was a contract killer. He was a schoolboy preacher turned Hollywood bad boy. Woody Harrelson talks about why he has too many regrets to mention – and how the ‘goddesses’ in his life calmed him down


It’s November in London and it’s cold in the room, but Woody Harrelson has brought the Texas heat with him. His eyes are alight and he speaks in warm gusts, like a hill-country preacher after a shot of straight bourbon. He’s talking peace and love, freedom and repentance. He reckons he’s found an alternative path, towards a land of clean air, raw food and legalised marijuana. How cool it would be if America came too.

While I’d think twice before hitching my wagon to so wayward a star, I’m always delighted to see Harrelson on the screen. His very presence guarantees that the ride will be interesting – and often actively wild. I loved him in his corn-fed, handsome youth, playing the dopey junior bartender in Cheers, and I adore him in his dented, haunted middle age, lost in the bayou on True Detective. In person, too, the man can be devilishly good company, a natural born spellbinder. Sometimes to the point where he bamboozles himself.

It would not be unfair to call me an anarchist,” he declares at one point, after the herbal tea has kicked in and the air-con has been switched off. “Because I am really not a believer in big government. If you mention big government, that sends up a lot of red flags.” He frowns at his hands, mentally re-weighs the evidence. “I suppose, in a limited way, big government is necessary.”

The actor is in town to plug his role in Mockingjay – Part 2, the stentorian final stanza of the Hunger Games franchise, in which rebels unseat the old order in a parallel US. He has also just played Lyndon B Johnson, the great bear of big government, in a new film for Rob Reiner called LBJ. He was in Dallas last week; they re-created the motorcade by the old book depository. What with LBJ and The Hunger Games,he’s been thinking a lot about politics and power, and how noble ideals can be turned inside out.

He arranges himself on the couch, a vision in autumnal browns, clad in lightweight hemp fabric that can’t quite keep out the chill. “Of course, we live in a completely corrupted world where every government is just a bunch of businessmen working for a bunch of bigger businessmen and none of them give a shit about the people,” he says. “The sad fact is no one knows how to change it, because no one knows how to take on the corporations. So I guess we’re stuck with this system until the oil runs out.


LBJ is a case in point. Harrelson loved playing the man; he became obsessed with the role. He has spent most of this morning still reading about him. “Now Johnson was a colourful character, and he did a lot of good things. Civil rights, war on poverty, endowments for the arts. But then he gets bogged down in Vietnam and becomes like every other president. He has to go along to get along. That’s the tragedy.”

He takes a mouthful of tea and shakes his head. He suspects there are wider factors at work and that the rot set in early; some vital connection was lost. “In the US, when white folks came on to the land and declared they discovered it in spite of the millions of people who inhabited it already, they actually adopted a lot of what became our government from the Iroquois confederacy.” He draws a breath. “But the crucial thing they left out was something called the council of women elders. And I really like the idea of a council of women elders. These people who have nothing to gain and who aren’t influenced by money and do good for the people. It would be nice to get something like that going again now.

Harrelson was born at the start of the 60s, in Midland, Texas, then relocated to Ohio on the cusp of his teens. The family was devoutly religious. Harrelson was a schoolboy preacher and attended a Presbyterian college. I’ve read that he was raised by his mother, his grandmother and his great-grandmother, Polly. It sounds like his own personal council of women elders.


That’s right, I suppose it was. It was very matriarchal in my family. And it still is, very similar. I’ve got three daughters, the goddesses. And there’s my wife. And the dog is female. And so is the cat. Females, females everywhere. I like a lot of yin energy. I’m very appreciative of women. I’m talking generally, not in the romantic sense, that’s a whole separate thing.” Another breath. “Although it’s true I’m appreciative of them in that sense as well.”

Where was his father in all this? Was he ever discussed? But raising the subject of his dad pulls Harrelson up short. He turns very still. His blue eyes freeze over. “Umm,” he says. “I guess I should have seen that segue was coming.”

Charles Harrelson was a contract killer, convicted for the murder of a grain dealer and then later for the shooting of a federal judge. He once bragged that he had had a hand in the Kennedy assassination. Conspiracy theorists put him as the youngest of the three tramps in the railyards near Dealey Plaza. It’s a dark and curious tale, but not one the actor is keen to revisit in public.

Well, he was gone,” he says simply. “He was gone much of the time, since he was in prison from the time I was seven, except for a year and a half respite, right through to his death. It sounds pretty sad and pathetic, but that’s just how life was. Kids don’t walk around saying, ‘Oh, I’ve got this terrible situation.’ They just get on with being kids.”

Does he find he thinks about his father more now that he’s older? “Umm. I do think about him, sure. But those aren’t the things that preoccupy me. I mean, that’s the past. You don’t forget the past. You carry it with you, and hopefully learn from it. But you live in the present.”

Harrelson, like America, was born out of bloodshed and religion. Like America, too, he grew too big too quickly, when he was young, brash and headstrong. Not long out of college, he landed his breakthrough gig in Cheers, a lovable sitcom about losers and boozers in a Boston bar “where everybody knows your name”. After that came roles as a psycho-killer in Natural Born Killers and a paraplegic pornographer in The People vs Larry Flynt. But stardom spun his head. He drank too deeply, sowed his oats too freely, and had a number of run-ins with the police. It took time to straighten out and settle down.

I was 24 when I became famous,” he says. “And that’s a big adjustment. Even the most amazing people get tainted. And I got drunk on success. My ego flared up. There’s a lot of asshole things that I did that I can never take back. I carry a whole fricking boatload of regrets – too many to mention. We’d be here all day.

An assistant glides in to drape a fleece over his shoulders. He says: “The principal trouble with the entertainment industry – and I’ve seen it a lot, I’ve been hanging around 30 years and I’ve met everybody – is ego.” Another pause. “You have a person who has a hole in their life and they want it to be filled with attention and love. Maybe they didn’t get enough love as a kid. Maybe they’re a glutton for love. Or maybe we all just want love, period.

So you become a famous rock star or actor, and you’re getting all this love from people who don’t know you. And it’s just a total head trip. It solves the initial problem, but the hole is not going to be filled up with that silly putty. It needs something real. It’s been a long enough journey that I feel I’ve evolved into a much better person. But I still feel I’ve got a hell of a long way to go.”

He credits his wife, Laura, and the three goddesses (two of whom have now departed for college) with providing a solid foundation. He credits his home in Hawaii for keeping Hollywood at arm’s length. “Oh, Hawaii,” he enthuses. “That’s the most amazing oasis. An incredible community of people who love each other and look out for each other and you don’t worry when the kids play out in the neighbourhood. Everybody knows everybody.

He’s making it sound like the bar back in Cheers. “Well, I guess,” shrugs Harrelson. “But, you know, real.

syTLKpwl.jpg

Illinois, USA
Young relatives of Tyshawn Lee, 9, pay respects at the carrier holding the the boy’s casket. Tyshawn was shot multiple times in the face and back in an alley in a gang-related attack
Photograph: Nancy Stone


4E51ZrUl.jpg

Manila, Philippines
Street children sleep in a park. Photograph: Jay Directo


0ms8oq2l.jpg

Cologne, Germany
Costumed woman await the start of the carnival season. Photograph: AFP


Triple 9: A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan the murder of a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet across town. Director: John Hillcoat, Writer: Matt Cook, Cast: Norman Reedus, Kate Winslet, Teresa Palmer, Woody Harrelson, Aaron Paul, Chiwetel Eijofor, Casy Affleck, 2016, Crime.









Wishing you all good morning, good afternoon, good evening, good night and good luck for tomorrow ! 8dOmi6C.gif


dazpicable avatar
Posted: Wed Nov 11, 2015 18:33
Author: Site FriendET junkieET loverSunTurtle
Thalestris wrote:
Hi everybody ! So it was Armistice Day here as well.. Meaning that nobody was working. Apart from that , I chose that fresh interview of Woody Harrelson for you , hoping that you haven't all read it yet um? Plus a few pics and 2 trailers , but one amongst those 2 is really special I think and the movie should be interesting...

Co0HnBFl.jpg

Woody Harrelson interview: 'We live in a completely corrupted world'

His father was a contract killer. He was a schoolboy preacher turned Hollywood bad boy. Woody Harrelson talks about why he has too many regrets to mention – and how the ‘goddesses’ in his life calmed him down


It’s November in London and it’s cold in the room, but Woody Harrelson has brought the Texas heat with him. His eyes are alight and he speaks in warm gusts, like a hill-country preacher after a shot of straight bourbon. He’s talking peace and love, freedom and repentance. He reckons he’s found an alternative path, towards a land of clean air, raw food and legalised marijuana. How cool it would be if America came too.

While I’d think twice before hitching my wagon to so wayward a star, I’m always delighted to see Harrelson on the screen. His very presence guarantees that the ride will be interesting – and often actively wild. I loved him in his corn-fed, handsome youth, playing the dopey junior bartender in Cheers, and I adore him in his dented, haunted middle age, lost in the bayou on True Detective. In person, too, the man can be devilishly good company, a natural born spellbinder. Sometimes to the point where he bamboozles himself.

It would not be unfair to call me an anarchist,” he declares at one point, after the herbal tea has kicked in and the air-con has been switched off. “Because I am really not a believer in big government. If you mention big government, that sends up a lot of red flags.” He frowns at his hands, mentally re-weighs the evidence. “I suppose, in a limited way, big government is necessary.”
The Woody harrelson interview very interesting cheers Thalestris,loving The knick as well some good characters in that as well as the major roles.

The actor is in town to plug his role in Mockingjay – Part 2, the stentorian final stanza of the Hunger Games franchise, in which rebels unseat the old order in a parallel US. He has also just played Lyndon B Johnson, the great bear of big government, in a new film for Rob Reiner called LBJ. He was in Dallas last week; they re-created the motorcade by the old book depository. What with LBJ and The Hunger Games,he’s been thinking a lot about politics and power, and how noble ideals can be turned inside out.

He arranges himself on the couch, a vision in autumnal browns, clad in lightweight hemp fabric that can’t quite keep out the chill. “Of course, we live in a completely corrupted world where every government is just a bunch of businessmen working for a bunch of bigger businessmen and none of them give a shit about the people,” he says. “The sad fact is no one knows how to change it, because no one knows how to take on the corporations. So I guess we’re stuck with this system until the oil runs out.


LBJ is a case in point. Harrelson loved playing the man; he became obsessed with the role. He has spent most of this morning still reading about him. “Now Johnson was a colourful character, and he did a lot of good things. Civil rights, war on poverty, endowments for the arts. But then he gets bogged down in Vietnam and becomes like every other president. He has to go along to get along. That’s the tragedy.”

He takes a mouthful of tea and shakes his head. He suspects there are wider factors at work and that the rot set in early; some vital connection was lost. “In the US, when white folks came on to the land and declared they discovered it in spite of the millions of people who inhabited it already, they actually adopted a lot of what became our government from the Iroquois confederacy.” He draws a breath. “But the crucial thing they left out was something called the council of women elders. And I really like the idea of a council of women elders. These people who have nothing to gain and who aren’t influenced by money and do good for the people. It would be nice to get something like that going again now.

Harrelson was born at the start of the 60s, in Midland, Texas, then relocated to Ohio on the cusp of his teens. The family was devoutly religious. Harrelson was a schoolboy preacher and attended a Presbyterian college. I’ve read that he was raised by his mother, his grandmother and his great-grandmother, Polly. It sounds like his own personal council of women elders.


That’s right, I suppose it was. It was very matriarchal in my family. And it still is, very similar. I’ve got three daughters, the goddesses. And there’s my wife. And the dog is female. And so is the cat. Females, females everywhere. I like a lot of yin energy. I’m very appreciative of women. I’m talking generally, not in the romantic sense, that’s a whole separate thing.” Another breath. “Although it’s true I’m appreciative of them in that sense as well.”

Where was his father in all this? Was he ever discussed? But raising the subject of his dad pulls Harrelson up short. He turns very still. His blue eyes freeze over. “Umm,” he says. “I guess I should have seen that segue was coming.”

Charles Harrelson was a contract killer, convicted for the murder of a grain dealer and then later for the shooting of a federal judge. He once bragged that he had had a hand in the Kennedy assassination. Conspiracy theorists put him as the youngest of the three tramps in the railyards near Dealey Plaza. It’s a dark and curious tale, but not one the actor is keen to revisit in public.

Well, he was gone,” he says simply. “He was gone much of the time, since he was in prison from the time I was seven, except for a year and a half respite, right through to his death. It sounds pretty sad and pathetic, but that’s just how life was. Kids don’t walk around saying, ‘Oh, I’ve got this terrible situation.’ They just get on with being kids.”

Does he find he thinks about his father more now that he’s older? “Umm. I do think about him, sure. But those aren’t the things that preoccupy me. I mean, that’s the past. You don’t forget the past. You carry it with you, and hopefully learn from it. But you live in the present.”

Harrelson, like America, was born out of bloodshed and religion. Like America, too, he grew too big too quickly, when he was young, brash and headstrong. Not long out of college, he landed his breakthrough gig in Cheers, a lovable sitcom about losers and boozers in a Boston bar “where everybody knows your name”. After that came roles as a psycho-killer in Natural Born Killers and a paraplegic pornographer in The People vs Larry Flynt. But stardom spun his head. He drank too deeply, sowed his oats too freely, and had a number of run-ins with the police. It took time to straighten out and settle down.

I was 24 when I became famous,” he says. “And that’s a big adjustment. Even the most amazing people get tainted. And I got drunk on success. My ego flared up. There’s a lot of asshole things that I did that I can never take back. I carry a whole fricking boatload of regrets – too many to mention. We’d be here all day.

An assistant glides in to drape a fleece over his shoulders. He says: “The principal trouble with the entertainment industry – and I’ve seen it a lot, I’ve been hanging around 30 years and I’ve met everybody – is ego.” Another pause. “You have a person who has a hole in their life and they want it to be filled with attention and love. Maybe they didn’t get enough love as a kid. Maybe they’re a glutton for love. Or maybe we all just want love, period.

So you become a famous rock star or actor, and you’re getting all this love from people who don’t know you. And it’s just a total head trip. It solves the initial problem, but the hole is not going to be filled up with that silly putty. It needs something real. It’s been a long enough journey that I feel I’ve evolved into a much better person. But I still feel I’ve got a hell of a long way to go.”

He credits his wife, Laura, and the three goddesses (two of whom have now departed for college) with providing a solid foundation. He credits his home in Hawaii for keeping Hollywood at arm’s length. “Oh, Hawaii,” he enthuses. “That’s the most amazing oasis. An incredible community of people who love each other and look out for each other and you don’t worry when the kids play out in the neighbourhood. Everybody knows everybody.

He’s making it sound like the bar back in Cheers. “Well, I guess,” shrugs Harrelson. “But, you know, real.

syTLKpwl.jpg

Illinois, USA
Young relatives of Tyshawn Lee, 9, pay respects at the carrier holding the the boy’s casket. Tyshawn was shot multiple times in the face and back in an alley in a gang-related attack
Photograph: Nancy Stone


4E51ZrUl.jpg

Manila, Philippines
Street children sleep in a park. Photograph: Jay Directo


0ms8oq2l.jpg

Cologne, Germany
Costumed woman await the start of the carnival season. Photograph: AFP


Triple 9: A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan the murder of a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet across town. Director: John Hillcoat, Writer: Matt Cook, Cast: Norman Reedus, Kate Winslet, Teresa Palmer, Woody Harrelson, Aaron Paul, Chiwetel Eijofor, Casy Affleck, 2016, Crime.









Wishing you all good morning, good afternoon, good evening, good night and good luck for tomorrow ! 8dOmi6C.gif

Thalestris avatar
Posted: Thu Nov 12, 2015 18:18
Author: Turtle
Hi Daz .. um I see that you weren't able to fix that bug on your post .. But I do know that you've enjoyed both interviews so I'm happy.. Hopefully next time your answer will show up ! 8dOmi6C.gif

So how is everybody ? And what's up in the world.. ? Ok to be honest, I had a busy day, so not enough time to read as much as usual .. So I chose that article which caught my eyes straight away, plus a few pics and 2 trailers.

9E36PKHl.jpg

Peter Magubane's best photograph: a girl and her maid on a 'Europeans only' bench

‘The police once broke my nose when I refused to destroy my images. I was sent to solitary for 586 days’

Working as a black photographer in apartheid South Africa was not easy. You had to always know where you were and who was around you. If the police were there, you couldn’t take photos – and the police were always there. If it was difficult for me to get a shot openly, I’d have to improvise: hide my camera in a loaf of bread, a half-pint of milk, even a Bible. When I got back to the office, I had to have a picture with me no matter what. My editors at the Rand Daily Mail would not take any nonsense. But that was fine – they wanted the pictures and I wanted to become one of the greats.

I did not want to leave the country to find another life. I was going to stay and fight with my camera as my gun. I did not want to kill anyone, though. I wanted to kill apartheid. My editors always pushed me. “Work as hard as you can,” they’d say, “to defeat this animal apartheid. Show the world what is happening.”

I never staged pictures. They were moments I came across. I took this in 1956, while driving through a wealthy suburb in Johannesburg. I saw the girl on the bench and stopped. The woman worked for her parents, most likely a rich local family.

These labels – “Europeans only”, “Coloureds only” – were on everything, by order of the government. When I saw Europeans only, I knew I would have to approach with caution. But I didn’t have a long lens, just my 35mm, so I had to get close. I did not interact with the woman or the child, though. I never ask permission when taking photos. I have worked amid massacres, with hundreds of people being killed around me, and you can’t ask for permission. I apologise afterwards, if someone feels insulted, but I want the picture.

I took about five shots and went straight back to the office. I processed it, then showed it to the editor and he said it was wonderful. It was published worldwide: for a lot of countries, apartheid was the news of the day. Ever since, I have been trying to find the woman and child. I have no leads, but I would love to say: “Thank you very much, for not interfering with me when I took this.”

I was arrested many times and the police would beat the hell out of me. They fractured my nose once because I refused to expose my film and ruin my images. In 1974, they arrested me and I was put in solitary confinement for 586 days. You weren’t told you’re going to solitary in apartheid South Africa: you only found out when you reached your cell.

You didn’t get visitors. The only person you saw was the guard, who would say: “Don’t talk to me.” But I knew there were people in worse shape than I: Namibians in cells downstairs were beaten every day, every night. Fortunately I was not beaten, because they knew my newspaper was looking out for me. All they could do was lock me away. A bird would come and sit on the windowsill. When I stood up, it would fly away. All I could think about was how much I wanted to be that bird.

Towards the end of 1975, I was released but banned from taking photos for five years. I couldn’t leave my house without the police knowing. When they released me, I said to myself: “I am not going to abide by the rules of these people. I am taking pictures, not committing a crime.” So in 1976, when the Soweto uprising happened, I went with my camera and a vengeance. Because of my photos, the entire world saw what was happening.

Peter Magubane’s CV
Born: Johannesburg, 1932.


Studied: “There were no colleges for black people, so I could not study photography. I learnt while working as a driver for a magazine called Drum.”

Influences: John Morris and the Capa brothers, Robert and Cornell. Robert never asked for permission either.

High point: “I was the first black photographer in South Africa to have his own exhibition, in 1961.”

Low point: “Covering the Soweto uprising. It was a difficult day.”

Top tip: “Don’t ask people to pose. Just go out into the street and take photos of everything that catches your eye. That will build you as a photographer.”

RuzWYFdl.jpg

Hong Kong, China
A man sleeps at a table in a McDonald’s restaurant. McDonald’s 24-hour fast food restaurants have become popular among homeless people. Photograph: Tyrone Siu


CsUYwP2l.jpg

Jakarta, Indonesia
The fingers of an orangutan protrude from a cage as it arrives at Halim Perdana Kusuma airport. Thailand returned 14 smuggled apes to Indonesia. Photograph: Mast Irham


kmONn8Fl.jpg

Phnom Penh, Cambodia
A kite is seen during the annual Khmer kite flying festival. Photograph: Samrang Pring










Wishing you a great Thursday morning, afternoon, evening ! And good luck for tomorrow ! 8dOmi6C.gif
dazpicable avatar
Posted: Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:46
Author: Site FriendET junkieET loverSunTurtle
dazpicable wrote:
Thalestris wrote:
Hi everybody ! So it was Armistice Day here as well.. Meaning that nobody was working. Apart from that , I chose that fresh interview of Woody Harrelson for you , hoping that you haven't all read it yet um? Plus a few pics and 2 trailers , but one amongst those 2 is really special I think and the movie should be interesting...

Co0HnBFl.jpg

Woody Harrelson interview: 'We live in a completely corrupted world'

His father was a contract killer. He was a schoolboy preacher turned Hollywood bad boy. Woody Harrelson talks about why he has too many regrets to mention – and how the ‘goddesses’ in his life calmed him down


It’s November in London and it’s cold in the room, but Woody Harrelson has brought the Texas heat with him. His eyes are alight and he speaks in warm gusts, like a hill-country preacher after a shot of straight bourbon. He’s talking peace and love, freedom and repentance. He reckons he’s found an alternative path, towards a land of clean air, raw food and legalised marijuana. How cool it would be if America came too.

While I’d think twice before hitching my wagon to so wayward a star, I’m always delighted to see Harrelson on the screen. His very presence guarantees that the ride will be interesting – and often actively wild. I loved him in his corn-fed, handsome youth, playing the dopey junior bartender in Cheers, and I adore him in his dented, haunted middle age, lost in the bayou on True Detective. In person, too, the man can be devilishly good company, a natural born spellbinder. Sometimes to the point where he bamboozles himself.

It would not be unfair to call me an anarchist,” he declares at one point, after the herbal tea has kicked in and the air-con has been switched off. “Because I am really not a believer in big government. If you mention big government, that sends up a lot of red flags.” He frowns at his hands, mentally re-weighs the evidence. “I suppose, in a limited way, big government is necessary.”
The Woody harrelson interview very interesting cheers Thalestris,loving The knick as well some good characters in that as well as the major roles.

The actor is in town to plug his role in Mockingjay – Part 2, the stentorian final stanza of the Hunger Games franchise, in which rebels unseat the old order in a parallel US. He has also just played Lyndon B Johnson, the great bear of big government, in a new film for Rob Reiner called LBJ. He was in Dallas last week; they re-created the motorcade by the old book depository. What with LBJ and The Hunger Games,he’s been thinking a lot about politics and power, and how noble ideals can be turned inside out.

He arranges himself on the couch, a vision in autumnal browns, clad in lightweight hemp fabric that can’t quite keep out the chill. “Of course, we live in a completely corrupted world where every government is just a bunch of businessmen working for a bunch of bigger businessmen and none of them give a shit about the people,” he says. “The sad fact is no one knows how to change it, because no one knows how to take on the corporations. So I guess we’re stuck with this system until the oil runs out.


LBJ is a case in point. Harrelson loved playing the man; he became obsessed with the role. He has spent most of this morning still reading about him. “Now Johnson was a colourful character, and he did a lot of good things. Civil rights, war on poverty, endowments for the arts. But then he gets bogged down in Vietnam and becomes like every other president. He has to go along to get along. That’s the tragedy.”

He takes a mouthful of tea and shakes his head. He suspects there are wider factors at work and that the rot set in early; some vital connection was lost. “In the US, when white folks came on to the land and declared they discovered it in spite of the millions of people who inhabited it already, they actually adopted a lot of what became our government from the Iroquois confederacy.” He draws a breath. “But the crucial thing they left out was something called the council of women elders. And I really like the idea of a council of women elders. These people who have nothing to gain and who aren’t influenced by money and do good for the people. It would be nice to get something like that going again now.

Harrelson was born at the start of the 60s, in Midland, Texas, then relocated to Ohio on the cusp of his teens. The family was devoutly religious. Harrelson was a schoolboy preacher and attended a Presbyterian college. I’ve read that he was raised by his mother, his grandmother and his great-grandmother, Polly. It sounds like his own personal council of women elders.


That’s right, I suppose it was. It was very matriarchal in my family. And it still is, very similar. I’ve got three daughters, the goddesses. And there’s my wife. And the dog is female. And so is the cat. Females, females everywhere. I like a lot of yin energy. I’m very appreciative of women. I’m talking generally, not in the romantic sense, that’s a whole separate thing.” Another breath. “Although it’s true I’m appreciative of them in that sense as well.”

Where was his father in all this? Was he ever discussed? But raising the subject of his dad pulls Harrelson up short. He turns very still. His blue eyes freeze over. “Umm,” he says. “I guess I should have seen that segue was coming.”

Charles Harrelson was a contract killer, convicted for the murder of a grain dealer and then later for the shooting of a federal judge. He once bragged that he had had a hand in the Kennedy assassination. Conspiracy theorists put him as the youngest of the three tramps in the railyards near Dealey Plaza. It’s a dark and curious tale, but not one the actor is keen to revisit in public.

Well, he was gone,” he says simply. “He was gone much of the time, since he was in prison from the time I was seven, except for a year and a half respite, right through to his death. It sounds pretty sad and pathetic, but that’s just how life was. Kids don’t walk around saying, ‘Oh, I’ve got this terrible situation.’ They just get on with being kids.”

Does he find he thinks about his father more now that he’s older? “Umm. I do think about him, sure. But those aren’t the things that preoccupy me. I mean, that’s the past. You don’t forget the past. You carry it with you, and hopefully learn from it. But you live in the present.”

Harrelson, like America, was born out of bloodshed and religion. Like America, too, he grew too big too quickly, when he was young, brash and headstrong. Not long out of college, he landed his breakthrough gig in Cheers, a lovable sitcom about losers and boozers in a Boston bar “where everybody knows your name”. After that came roles as a psycho-killer in Natural Born Killers and a paraplegic pornographer in The People vs Larry Flynt. But stardom spun his head. He drank too deeply, sowed his oats too freely, and had a number of run-ins with the police. It took time to straighten out and settle down.

I was 24 when I became famous,” he says. “And that’s a big adjustment. Even the most amazing people get tainted. And I got drunk on success. My ego flared up. There’s a lot of asshole things that I did that I can never take back. I carry a whole fricking boatload of regrets – too many to mention. We’d be here all day.

An assistant glides in to drape a fleece over his shoulders. He says: “The principal trouble with the entertainment industry – and I’ve seen it a lot, I’ve been hanging around 30 years and I’ve met everybody – is ego.” Another pause. “You have a person who has a hole in their life and they want it to be filled with attention and love. Maybe they didn’t get enough love as a kid. Maybe they’re a glutton for love. Or maybe we all just want love, period.

So you become a famous rock star or actor, and you’re getting all this love from people who don’t know you. And it’s just a total head trip. It solves the initial problem, but the hole is not going to be filled up with that silly putty. It needs something real. It’s been a long enough journey that I feel I’ve evolved into a much better person. But I still feel I’ve got a hell of a long way to go.”

He credits his wife, Laura, and the three goddesses (two of whom have now departed for college) with providing a solid foundation. He credits his home in Hawaii for keeping Hollywood at arm’s length. “Oh, Hawaii,” he enthuses. “That’s the most amazing oasis. An incredible community of people who love each other and look out for each other and you don’t worry when the kids play out in the neighbourhood. Everybody knows everybody.

He’s making it sound like the bar back in Cheers. “Well, I guess,” shrugs Harrelson. “But, you know, real.

syTLKpwl.jpg

Illinois, USA
Young relatives of Tyshawn Lee, 9, pay respects at the carrier holding the the boy’s casket. Tyshawn was shot multiple times in the face and back in an alley in a gang-related attack
Photograph: Nancy Stone


4E51ZrUl.jpg

Manila, Philippines
Street children sleep in a park. Photograph: Jay Directo


0ms8oq2l.jpg

Cologne, Germany
Costumed woman await the start of the carnival season. Photograph: AFP


Triple 9: A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan the murder of a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet across town. Director: John Hillcoat, Writer: Matt Cook, Cast: Norman Reedus, Kate Winslet, Teresa Palmer, Woody Harrelson, Aaron Paul, Chiwetel Eijofor, Casy Affleck, 2016, Crime.









Wishing you all good morning, good afternoon, good evening, good night and good luck for tomorrow ! 8dOmi6C.gif

Thalestris avatar
Posted: Fri Nov 13, 2015 17:14
Author: Turtle
Hi Daz, so still you're having issues, the glitch is still there um ? I'm going to make a bad joke since it's Friday the 13th.. May be that post is cursed or something ? If you try and quote another post tomorrow that might work perhaps ? I hope so because : Cg9k978.gif Daz !! 8dOmi6C.gif Come back my friend, talk to me !!

So hi everybody !! It is Friday the 13th indeed.. So I just couldn't help it, I had to say something about it.... And I'll add one pic and 2 trailers , and one movie is actually released today...

5Iaz00o.gif

G0sRNEf.gif

Donald Dossey, also a folklore historian and author of Holiday Folklore, Phobias and Fun, said fear of Friday the 13th is rooted in ancient, separate bad-luck associations with the number 13 and the day Friday. The two unlucky entities ultimately combined to make one super unlucky day.

Dossey traces the fear of 13 to a Norse myth about 12 gods having a dinner party at Valhalla, their heaven. In walked the uninvited 13th guest, the mischievous Loki. Once there, Loki arranged for Hoder, the blind god of darkness, to shoot Balder the Beautiful, the god of joy and gladness, with a mistletoe-tipped arrow.

"Balder died and the whole Earth got dark. The whole Earth mourned. It was a bad, unlucky day," said Dossey. From that moment on, the number 13 has been considered ominous and foreboding.

There is also a biblical reference to the unlucky number 13. Judas, the apostle who betrayed Jesus, was the 13th guest to the Last Supper.

Meanwhile, in ancient Rome, witches reportedly gathered in groups of 12. The 13th was believed to be the devil.

Thomas Fernsler, an associate policy scientist in the Mathematics and Science Education Resource Center at the University of Delaware in Newark, said the number 13 suffers because of its position after 12.

According to Fernsler, numerologists consider 12 a "complete" number. There are 12 months in a year, 12 signs of the zodiac, 12 gods of Olympus, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 tribes of Israel, and 12 apostles of Jesus.

In exceeding 12 by 1, Fernsler said 13's association with bad luck "has to do with just being a little beyond completeness. The number becomes restless or squirmy."

This fear of 13 is strong in today's world. According to Dossey, more than 80 percent of high-rises lack a 13th floor. Many airports skip the 13th gate. Hospitals and hotels regularly have no room number 13.

On streets in Florence, Italy, the house between number 12 and 14 is addressed as 12 and a half. In France socialites known as the quatorziens (fourteeners) once made themselves available as 14th guests to keep a dinner party from an unlucky fate.

Many triskaidekaphobes, as those who fear the unlucky integer are known, point to the ill-fated mission to the moon, Apollo 13.

As for Friday, it is well known among Christians as the day Jesus was crucified. Some biblical scholars believe Eve tempted Adam with the forbidden fruit on Friday. Perhaps most significant is a belief that Abel was slain by Cain on Friday the 13th.

Folklore offers other remedies, however. One recommendation is to climb to the top of a mountain or skyscraper and burn all the socks you own that have holes in them. Another is to stand on your head and eat a piece of gristle.

So if you fear the 13th, take your pick of remedies and let tomorrow bring its luck—good or bad.


pr2qowll.jpg

Wiltshire, England
Festival Of Light visitors admire an illuminated Chinese dragon displayed in the grounds of Longleat
Photograph: Matt Cardy


The Funhouse Massacre : Six of the world's scariest psychopaths escape from a local Asylum and proceed to unleash terror on the unsuspecting crowd of a Halloween Funhouse whose themed mazes are inspired by their various reigns of terror. Director: Andy Palmer, Writers: Ben Begley (screenplay), Ben Begley (story), Cast: Robert Englund, Scottie Thompson, Chasty Ballesteros, 2015, Horror.





Backtrack : Psychologist Peter Bower's life is thrown into turmoil when he discovers that the patients he has been seeing are ghosts. Risking his own sanity, Peter delves into his past to uncover a terrifying secret which only he can put right. Backtrack is a spine-chilling story from the acclaimed writer-director, Michael Petroni. Director: Michael Petroni, Writer: Michael Petroni, Cast: Adrien Brody, Sam Neill, Robin McLeavy, 2015, Thriller.





So happy Friday the 13th !! But stay safe !! hcHBVFQ.gif 8ucaZ8v.gif
dazpicable avatar
Posted: Fri Nov 13, 2015 18:17
Author: Site FriendET junkieET loverSunTurtle
Thalestris wrote:
Hi Daz, so still you're having issues, the glitch is still there um ? I'm going to make a bad joke since it's Friday the 13th.. May be that post is cursed or something ? If you try and quote another post tomorrow that might work perhaps ? I hope so because : Cg9k978.gif Daz !! 8dOmi6C.gif Come back my friend, talk to me !!

So hi everybody !! It is Friday the 13th indeed.. So I just couldn't help it, I had to say something about it.... And I'll add one pic and 2 trailers , and one movie is actually released today...

5Iaz00o.gif

G0sRNEf.gif

Donald Dossey, also a folklore historian and author of Holiday Folklore, Phobias and Fun, said fear of Friday the 13th is rooted in ancient, separate bad-luck associations with the number 13 and the day Friday. The two unlucky entities ultimately combined to make one super unlucky day.

Dossey traces the fear of 13 to a Norse myth about 12 gods having a dinner party at Valhalla, their heaven. In walked the uninvited 13th guest, the mischievous Loki. Once there, Loki arranged for Hoder, the blind god of darkness, to shoot Balder the Beautiful, the god of joy and gladness, with a mistletoe-tipped arrow.

"Balder died and the whole Earth got dark. The whole Earth mourned. It was a bad, unlucky day," said Dossey. From that moment on, the number 13 has been considered ominous and foreboding.

There is also a biblical reference to the unlucky number 13. Judas, the apostle who betrayed Jesus, was the 13th guest to the Last Supper.

Meanwhile, in ancient Rome, witches reportedly gathered in groups of 12. The 13th was believed to be the devil.

Thomas Fernsler, an associate policy scientist in the Mathematics and Science Education Resource Center at the University of Delaware in Newark, said the number 13 suffers because of its position after 12.

According to Fernsler, numerologists consider 12 a "complete" number. There are 12 months in a year, 12 signs of the zodiac, 12 gods of Olympus, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 tribes of Israel, and 12 apostles of Jesus.

In exceeding 12 by 1, Fernsler said 13's association with bad luck "has to do with just being a little beyond completeness. The number becomes restless or squirmy."

This fear of 13 is strong in today's world. According to Dossey, more than 80 percent of high-rises lack a 13th floor. Many airports skip the 13th gate. Hospitals and hotels regularly have no room number 13.

On streets in Florence, Italy, the house between number 12 and 14 is addressed as 12 and a half. In France socialites known as the quatorziens (fourteeners) once made themselves available as 14th guests to keep a dinner party from an unlucky fate.

Many triskaidekaphobes, as those who fear the unlucky integer are known, point to the ill-fated mission to the moon, Apollo 13.

As for Friday, it is well known among Christians as the day Jesus was crucified. Some biblical scholars believe Eve tempted Adam with the forbidden fruit on Friday. Perhaps most significant is a belief that Abel was slain by Cain on Friday the 13th.

Folklore offers other remedies, however. One recommendation is to climb to the top of a mountain or skyscraper and burn all the socks you own that have holes in them. Another is to stand on your head and eat a piece of gristle.

So if you fear the 13th, take your pick of remedies and let tomorrow bring its luck—good or bad.


pr2qowll.jpg

Wiltshire, England
Festival Of Light visitors admire an illuminated Chinese dragon displayed in the grounds of Longleat
Photograph: Matt Cardy


The Funhouse Massacre : Six of the world's scariest psychopaths escape from a local Asylum and proceed to unleash terror on the unsuspecting crowd of a Halloween Funhouse whose themed mazes are inspired by their various reigns of terror. Director: Andy Palmer, Writers: Ben Begley (screenplay), Ben Begley (story), Cast: Robert Englund, Scottie Thompson, Chasty Ballesteros, 2015, Horror.





Backtrack : Psychologist Peter Bower's life is thrown into turmoil when he discovers that the patients he has been seeing are ghosts. Risking his own sanity, Peter delves into his past to uncover a terrifying secret which only he can put right. Backtrack is a spine-chilling story from the acclaimed writer-director, Michael Petroni. Director: Michael Petroni, Writer: Michael Petroni, Cast: Adrien Brody, Sam Neill, Robin McLeavy, 2015, Thriller.





So happy Friday the 13th !! But stay safe !! hcHBVFQ.gif 8ucaZ8v.gif
Backtrack looks good
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Sat Nov 14, 2015 12:56
Author: Turtle
Hi everybody .. Well , what can I say.. I just left you yesterday happy, making jokes about Friday the 13th and I went to bed early, before the attacks .. And I woke up this morning listening to the news on the radio.. Some of those events occurred exactly where I used to live in Paris for years .. So I spent my whole morning trying to reach 2 people that I know and live there.. and who are safe fortunately.

My apologies to all my ET friends today, but there won't be a fun post for the week end because I just can't focus on anything else. I'm still actually listening to the news right now and waiting for the decisions which are going to be made in Vienna now..

So you all take care, enjoy life !! Have fun ok ? And spend as much time as you can with your loved ones.

WwFnzRsl.png

Paris Facing Terror. Swaha, Lebanon. (French-Lebanese artist ,passionate editorial cartoonist,has collaborated with Al Akhbar , Al Hasnaa , Le Commerce du Levant, Le Monde edition Proche-Orient, Femme Magazine from 2004 to 2010, and Ad Dabbour in 2014. Now working as an independent artist.)







Thalestris avatar
Posted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 17:03
Author: Turtle
So hi everybody, I wasn't sure to be able to post something meaningful here today, it's been so weird in France since Friday as you can imagine.. So like all French people , I listened to almost all the "experts" on the radio and on tv and read everything really that I could think of and I tried to understand the why of all that violence and madness.. But thing is , there is no why.. Human beings aren't able to live peacefully together.. Some are, but others just won't. And history repeats itself again, greed, corruption, domination, racism, religion, fanatics,... Damn species ! And it's like a divorce, you need to be 2 to get divorced, I mean François Hollande isn't Superman, what is he thinking , that sending more bombs on Syria is going to solve the problem ? And isn't going to kill innocent people as well ? And what about the dictator Bashar-Al Assad ? So I was thinking waking up this morning :"Nah it's just a bad dream and things are going to go back to normal now.. " Well, nope, welcome to the XXI th century.

So I was like ok then, let's think about a post for tonight at lunchtime.. Some depressing serious article again perhaps? Hell no.. Don't they want more publicity those terrorists, I read that they are addicted to news.. So nope, no more story about ISIL sorry.

And I read this :

Qr9yul9l.jpg

"Ryan Gosling will definitely star in the Blade Runner sequel
...and if I say any more there’s a chip in me that will explode,’ the actor jokes

Ryan Gosling has confirmed he will star in the sequel to Blade Runner.

In April, we reported that the Drive star was in talks to appear in the follow-up to Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi classic, which will be directed by Denis Villeneuve (Sicario) and shot by cinematographer Roger Deakins (Fargo, Skyfall).

Now Gosling has confirmed his involvement in the project during an interview with Collider. “That’s true,” he said when asked if he would appear in the movie. “(…)it’s exciting. And if I say any more there’s a chip in me that will explode if I say anything else.”

Scott was initially attached to direct the film, but will now take a back seat as producer, with original star Harrison Ford tipped to make an appearance in the story’s “third act”.

And don't ask me why, but reading this I just burst into laughter , and that felt so good that I thought : Thank you Ryan you made my day ! We surely need to laugh, what else can we do in this crazy world you tell me !

So there won't be any depressing news article today, because it's useless. I'll post only good news and a few trailers ! and a quote in the end !

OuqOSgPl.jpg

BP's plans to drill for oil in the Great Australian Bight knocked back
Regulator says application to drill four exploration wells in region failed to meet environmental standards, but oil giant has vowed to try again.

















"It is true that our species is alone in the universe then I'd have to say the universe aimed rather low and settled for very little. " George Carlin.

Well be happy my ET friends, smile, laugh, make jokes and love !! Good luck for tomorrow !




dazpicable avatar
Posted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 18:08
Author: Site FriendET junkieET loverSunTurtle
Thalestris wrote:
So hi everybody, I wasn't sure to be able to post something meaningful here today, it's been so weird in France since Friday as you can imagine.. So like all French people , I listened to almost all the "experts" on the radio and on tv and read everything really that I could think of and I tried to understand the why of all that violence and madness.. But thing is , there is no why.. Human beings aren't able to live peacefully together.. Some are, but others just won't. And history repeats itself again, greed, corruption, domination, racism, religion, fanatics,... Damn species ! And it's like a divorce, you need to be 2 to get divorced, I mean François Hollande isn't Superman, what is he thinking , that sending more bombs on Syria is going to solve the problem ? And isn't going to kill innocent people as well ? And what about the dictator Bashar-Al Assad ? So I was thinking waking up this morning :"Nah it's just a bad dream and things are going to go back to normal now.. " Well, nope, welcome to the XXI th century.

So I was like ok then, let's think about a post for tonight at lunchtime.. Some depressing serious article again perhaps? Hell no.. Don't they want more publicity those terrorists, I read that they are addicted to news.. So nope, no more story about ISIL sorry.

And I read this : Agreed no more Isil garbage.
Divergent huh i think i spotted a certain actor in that trailer Thalestris lol, you know my daughter will be o so happy, that family really does get just about everywhere don't they.

Qr9yul9l.jpg

"Ryan Gosling will definitely star in the Blade Runner sequel
...and if I say any more there’s a chip in me that will explode,’ the actor jokes

Ryan Gosling has confirmed he will star in the sequel to Blade Runner.

In April, we reported that the Drive star was in talks to appear in the follow-up to Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi classic, which will be directed by Denis Villeneuve (Sicario) and shot by cinematographer Roger Deakins (Fargo, Skyfall).

Now Gosling has confirmed his involvement in the project during an interview with Collider. “That’s true,” he said when asked if he would appear in the movie. “(…)it’s exciting. And if I say any more there’s a chip in me that will explode if I say anything else.”

Scott was initially attached to direct the film, but will now take a back seat as producer, with original star Harrison Ford tipped to make an appearance in the story’s “third act”.

And don't ask me why, but reading this I just burst into laughter , and that felt so good that I thought : Thank you Ryan you made my day ! We surely need to laugh, what else can we do in this crazy world you tell me !

So there won't be any depressing news article today, because it's useless. I'll post only good news and a few trailers ! and a quote in the end !

OuqOSgPl.jpg

BP's plans to drill for oil in the Great Australian Bight knocked back
Regulator says application to drill four exploration wells in region failed to meet environmental standards, but oil giant has vowed to try again.

















"It is true that our species is alone in the universe then I'd have to say the universe aimed rather low and settled for very little. " George Carlin.

Well be happy my ET friends, smile, laugh, make jokes and love !! Good luck for tomorrow !



No more Isil garbage agreed.
Daughter will be very happy lol i spotted one of her favourites in that Divergent trailer lol they get everywhere don't they.
Thalestris avatar
Posted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 17:44
Author: Turtle
Hi Daz, well I'm glad that I made your daughter happy with that new trailer of Divergent ! 8dOmi6C.gif And hi everybody ! I hope that your English ET friends are able to log in today and all the other ET friends else where who had issues recently.. And as for today um.. Well I said that I would post good news and everything but that interview just broke my heart really, I admire the artist and I respect the man.. If I had been in Paris last Friday , I would have been listening to him at Le Trianon for sure.. I can only imagine how he must be feeling right now.. But I let you read this if you haven't read it yet? And I have some new trailers again today.. So here we go :

PtBOtPql.jpg

The Arcs at Le Trianon Friday night in Paris. Dan Auerbach and his band were less than three miles from Le Bataclan when the terrorist attacks took place David Wolff - Patrick

On Friday night, at around the same time terrorists stormed Parisian concert venue Bataclan, Black Keys singer Dan Auerbach was less than three miles away, performing at Le Trianon with his band the Arcs. The group had finished their set before learning of the tragic events unfolding nearby. "We were hunkered down listening for gunshots," Auerbach tells Rolling Stone. "We had people guarding all the doors, which were all locked up. We saw the helicopters flying above us; police cars just screaming by."

Auerbach's story is not unlike those of many who were in the city Friday night; a mix of bewilderment, fear and resourcefulness that if it wasn't real, would sound more like a Hollywood blockbuster than terrifying real-life scenario. The singer-guitarist detailed the events of the night to Rolling Stone.

We had gotten offstage at Le Trianon last night when the news started to trickle in. We heard sirens, but we didn't know what was going on. People started telling us there was a shooting. Then I heard there was a bombing at the Eagles of Death Metal concert. I said, "Are you kidding?" I texted [Eagles of Death Metal member] Josh Homme and I said, "Are you alright?" He said, "Yeah, I'm in L.A. Why?" I didn't put two and two together that he didn't tour with them. So I said, "Oh thank God, I just heard a horrible story." Then it turned out to be true. It's just awful.

We were playing a club almost the same as the Eagles of Death Metal: a 1,500-seat, 150-year-old theater [three] miles away from them, an American band. It's crazy. They locked down the building. We were there for about an hour. We heard there were still gunmen on the loose. We knew there were two separate hostage situations. We were on a balcony. We had a good vantage point. We were hunkered down listening for gunshots. We had people guarding all the doors, which were all locked up. We saw the helicopters flying above us; police cars just screaming by.

Our tour manager made the decision to get us all out of there, even though the president said that the borders were closed. So at midnight, we made a break for the bus and just hopped on and rolled out of town fairly easily and made it all the way to Milan without any trouble. We saw a lot of police cars and ambulances. There were a lot of people in the street, just looking, looking around. People seemed to be in disbelief.

Nick Alexander, one of the victims, was our merch guy. We'd been working with him for years. He was part of our family basically – one of those guys we'd see every time we come over here for these big European experiences we'd been having for 10-plus years. He was always there; a really nice guy, always with his mod haircut and his big smile.

When the Black Keys go out on the road, we're supporting about 30 people, and we have a very strong bond with these guys. Every band does. It's stronger than most working relationships because you're traveling in this weird gypsy lifestyle together. Nick was just a really nice guy. He was just an absolute rock & roll guy. He lived for it. Selling merch is a really, really tough job. He was one of the first ones in, last ones out. You have to be 100 percent prepared for that short burst of sales, that wave of people when they come in and when they come out. When you find someone really good at that job, you try to hold on to them. He was that guy for a lot of people.

The Black Keys played the Bataclan almost five years ago to the day. Nick [Movshon] and Leon [Michaels], who are in the Arcs, were in our touring band then. It's a place I've been to a lot; a place I've been with the guys I was with last night. It just really hit home. I know people that were there last night. I know people who are like, "What am I gonna do – see the Arcs or the Eagles of Death Metal?" And I've woken up feeling very out of sorts. What do you call it, survivors' remorse? Why the hell did it happen there and not where we were playing? I'm just so brokenhearted about all those people. And I think about our sound guy and lighting guy who would have been right there. It's so scary.

















Have a great Wednesday morning, afternoon, evening ... and good luck for tomorrow ! 8dOmi6C.gif





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